Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
SELECT ename
  ,    job
  ,    CASE deptno
         WHEN 10
           THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
         WHEN 20
           THEN 'SALES'
         ELSE 'UNKNOWN'
       END AS department
FROM emp /* !!! */ 
WHERE department = 'SALES'

This fails:

ORA-00904: "%s: invalid identifier"

Is there a way to overcome this limitation in Oracle 10.2 SQL ? How to use the 'case expression column' in where clause ?

share|improve this question
    
This seems correct, can you past your error ? –  Giann Jul 1 '11 at 8:52
    
00904. 00000 - "%s: invalid identifier" *Cause: *Action: –  EugeneP Jul 1 '11 at 8:57
    
The correct answer is the one of Martin Schapendonk. The problem is not in your case. –  Giann Jul 1 '11 at 9:01

5 Answers 5

The reason for this error is that the order than an SQL SELECT statement is processed is:

  • FROM: selection of one table or many JOINed ones and all rows combinations that match the ON conditions.

  • WHERE: conditions are evaluated and rows that do not match are removed.

  • GROUP BY: rows are grouped (and every group collapses to one row)

  • HAVING: conditions are evaluated and rows that do not match are removed.

  • SELECT: list of columns is evaluated.

  • DISTINCT: duplicate rows are removed (if it's a SELECT DISTINCT statement)

  • UNION, EXCEPT, INTERSECT: the action of that operand is taken upon the rows of sub-SELECT statements. For example, if it's a UNION, all rows are gathered (and duplicates eliminated unless it's a UNION ALL) after all sub-SELECT statements are evaluated. Accordingly for the EXCEPT or INTERSECT cases.

  • ORDER BY: rows are ordered.

Therefore, you can't use in WHERE clause, something that hasn't been populated or calculated yet. See also this question: oracle-sql-clause-evaluation-order

Note that database engines may as well choose another order of evaluation for a query (and that's what they usually do!) The only restriction is that the results would be the same as if the above order was used.


Solution is to enclose the query in another one:

SELECT *
FROM
  ( SELECT ename
         , job
         , CASE deptno
             WHEN 10 THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
             WHEN 20 THEN 'SALES'
                     ELSE 'UNKNOWN'
           END AS department
    FROM emp
  ) tmp
WHERE department = 'SALES' ;

or to duplicate the calculation in the WHERE condition:

SELECT ename
     , job
     , CASE deptno
         WHEN 10 THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
         WHEN 20 THEN 'SALES'
                 ELSE 'UNKNOWN'
       END AS department
FROM emp
WHERE
    CASE deptno
      WHEN 10 THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
      WHEN 20 THEN 'SALES'
              ELSE 'UNKNOWN'
    END = 'SALES' ;

I guess this is a simplified version of your query or you could use:

SELECT ename
     , job
     , 'SALES' AS department
FROM emp
WHERE deptno = 20 ;
share|improve this answer
    
What does it change ? –  Giann Jul 1 '11 at 8:57
    
yep this works but it is a bit of an overload. It seems this this the only correct way to do the job. Thank you. –  EugeneP Jul 1 '11 at 8:58
    
@Eugene: You could also rewrite the CASE in the WHERE clause. –  ypercube Jul 1 '11 at 8:59
    
yes you're right, but I simplified the query to get to the point. In my case it would be hard to rewrite it this way –  EugeneP Jul 1 '11 at 9:02
    
Your answer is the only correct one that solved the problem. cannot vote for it as I'm not logged in, but I choose it as the best. –  EugeneP Jul 1 '11 at 9:08

Your table does not contain a column "department" and thus you can not reference it in your where clause. Use deptno instead.

SELECT ename
,      job
,      CASE deptno
          WHEN 10
          THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
          WHEN 20
          THEN 'SALES'
          ELSE 'UNKNOWN'
       END AS department
FROM   emp /* !!! */ where deptno = 20;
share|improve this answer
    
The query result contains this column, and I guess this is the oracle architectural limitation. The cursor contains department column, no matter if it is a virtual field or a database thing. –  EugeneP Jul 1 '11 at 9:04
    
Call it whatever you want - it's the way things work in an Oracle database. –  Martin Schapendonk Jul 1 '11 at 9:09
1  
@EugeneP: It's not a limitation of Oracle. It's an SQL one. It's this way because WHERE conditions are to be evaluated before the SELECT columns are populated (or calculated). –  ypercube Jul 1 '11 at 9:16
    
Or(which has no meaning to do but) .... WHERE CASE deptno WHEN 10 THEN 'ACCOUNTS' WHEN 20 THEN 'SALES' ELSE 'UNKNOWN' END = 'SALES' –  niktrs Jul 1 '11 at 10:10
1  
You could use a predicate on department with a nested query, e.g. SELECT * FROM (SELECT ename, job, CASE ... END AS department FROM emp) WHERE department = 'SALES'). –  Dave Costa Jul 1 '11 at 12:24

This work for me :

SELECT ename, job
FROM   emp 
WHERE CASE WHEN deptno = 10 THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
           WHEN deptno = 20 THEN 'SALES'
           ELSE 'UNKNOWN'  
      END
      = 'SALES'
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, interesting solution. –  EugeneP Jul 1 '11 at 9:11
    
It's nice way. I was searching and found your solution perfectly worked for me. Thank you friend. –  NullPointer Dec 19 '13 at 13:14
select emp_.*
from (SELECT ename
  ,    job
  ,    CASE deptno
         WHEN 10
           THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
         WHEN 20
           THEN 'SALES'
         ELSE 'UNKNOWN'
       END AS department
FROM emp /* !!! */ ) emp_ where emp_.department='UNKNOWN';
share|improve this answer
1  
I believe this option has been covered by @ypercube. –  Andriy M Apr 21 '13 at 3:31

try:

  SQL> SELECT ename
      2  ,      job
      3  ,      CASE
      4            WHEN  deptno = 10
      5            THEN 'ACCOUNTS'
      6            WHEN  deptno = 20
      7            THEN 'SALES'
     12            ELSE 'UNKNOWN'
     13         END AS department
     14  FROM   emp /* !!! */ where department = 'SALES';
share|improve this answer
2  
This fails for the same reasons as the OP's attempt : You can't reference the SELECT's column's (department in this case) in the WHERE clause. You can only do that in the ORDER BY and HAVING clauses. –  MatBailie Jul 1 '11 at 9:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.