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I was wondering whether anyone still uses the "goto" keyword syntax in C# and what possible reasons there are for doing so.

I tend to view any statements that cause the reader to jump around the code as bad practice but wondered whether there were any credible scenarios for using such a syntax?

Goto Keyword Definition

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Servy, toniedzwiedz, aynber, cadrell0, SheetJS Oct 10 '13 at 22:02

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
When you do need to use it, you've probably painted yourself into corner. –  Grant Thomas Jul 1 '11 at 9:05
    
Possibly related question, stackoverflow.com/questions/2542289/… –  Cupcake Jul 1 '11 at 9:07
3  
what do you mean "still"? Was there a period of time people used it all the time [in c#]? –  Massif Jul 1 '11 at 10:22
2  
@Massif: "still" was intended to emphasise the modern opinion of the use of "goto" as a prelude to spaghetti code and a lack of readbility in source code. Very rarely do you see any code examples including this particular keyword which was why I was interested in asking in the first place. –  Brian Scott Jul 1 '11 at 12:36
24  
If the reader "jumping around" the code is bad practice then do you also avoid "break", "continue", "throw", and "return"? They all cause a branch in control flow, sometimes a non-local branch. "Throw" doesn't even tell you where it is going, unlike goto. –  Eric Lippert Jul 1 '11 at 13:57

11 Answers 11

up vote 31 down vote accepted

There are some (rare) cases where goto can actually improve readability. In fact, the documentation you linked to lists two examples:

A common use of goto is to transfer control to a specific switch-case label or the default label in a switch statement.

The goto statement is also useful to get out of deeply nested loops.

Here's an example for the latter one:

for (...) {
    for (...) {
        ...
        if (something)
            goto end_of_loop;
    }
}

end_of_loop:

Of course, there are other ways around this problem as well, such as refactoring the code into a function, using a dummy block around it, etc. (see this question for details). As a side note, the Java language designers decided to ban goto completely and introduce a labeled break statement instead.

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17  
Normally I'd try to refactor this to put the loops in a separate method which I could just return from... –  Jon Skeet Jul 1 '11 at 9:00
1  
@Heinzi - I have not seen goto being warranted. Like Jon says, if it is being "warranted", the code is begging to be refactored. –  manojlds Jul 1 '11 at 9:01
15  
labeled break, just a longer way of saying goto because it does the same freakin thing.... –  Jesus Ramos Jul 1 '11 at 9:02
9  
@Jesus but then with goto, you can go anywhere. Labeled break ensures you are going just outside the loop. –  mihsathe Jul 1 '11 at 9:03
1  
Unless you're being adventurous and using goto with an address (i've seen it done before) then that problem is mitigated. And I doubt someone is using detour hooks in your C# and Java code to exploit goto statements. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 1 '11 at 9:05

I remember this part

switch (a)     
{ 
    case 3: 
        b = 7;
        break;
    case 4: 
        c = 3;
        break; 
    default: 
        b = 2;
        c = 4;
        break; 
}

To something like this

switch (a)     
{
    case 3: 
        b = 7;
        goto case 4;    
    case 4: 
        c = 3;
        break;     
    default: 
        b = 2;
        c = 4;
        break;
}

Refer This

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7  
I actually see this as the most valid reason to use [goto] yet. At least in this scenario it increases readability for programmers unaware that cases drop into each other without a break statement. –  Brian Scott Jul 1 '11 at 9:44
6  
@Brian Scott, V4Vendetta. Unless I'm mistaken the first statement doesn't compile in C#. That would aid the programmer's understanding. –  Jodrell Jul 1 '11 at 9:56

I use it extensively in Eduasync to show the kind of code that the compiler generates for you when using async methods in C# 5. You'd see the same thing in iterator blocks.

In "normal" code though, I can't remember the last time I used it...

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1  
can you provide a small example of why this approach was preferred or was it simply a personal preference? –  Brian Scott Jul 1 '11 at 9:04
    
@Brian: It's not really clear what you mean. Eduasync shows the equivalent C# code to what the compiler does for you - and it generates code which uses goto, effectively... –  Jon Skeet Jul 1 '11 at 9:43
    
@Downvoter: Care to comment? –  Jon Skeet Jul 5 '11 at 17:05

goto is great for breaking out of many loops where break would not work well (say upon error conditions), and as Kragen said goto is used by the compiler to generate switch statements and some other things as well.

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5  
Surely "break" / "continue" are better approaches to loop management rather than requiring the code editor to jump around the source code trying to understand where the next step occurs? –  Brian Scott Jul 1 '11 at 9:03
1  
Not if you have nested loops. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 1 '11 at 9:12
    
ok, I can see this as a valid scenario. –  Brian Scott Jul 1 '11 at 9:41
1  
In an error condition, you should consider throwing an exception. –  Jodrell Jul 1 '11 at 9:44
2  
If you want to handle the error internally without an exception this would be a valid way to do so. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 1 '11 at 9:46

The compiler uses goto statements in various pieces of generated code, for example in generated iterator block types (generated when using the yield return keyword - I'm pretty sure that the generated XML serialisation types also have a few goto statements in there somewhere too.

See Iterator block implementation details: auto-generated state machines for some more details on why / how the C# compiler handles this.

Other than generated code there isn't a good reason to use a goto statement in normal code - it makes the code harder to understand and as a result more error-prone. On the other hand using goto statements in generated code like this can simplify the generation process and is normally fine because nobody is going to read (or modify) the generated code and there is no chance of mistakes being made because a machine is doing the writing.

See Go-to statement considered harmful for an argument against goto as well as a classic piece of programming history.

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+1 for the whitepaper, found it interesting. –  Brian Scott Jul 1 '11 at 9:42
    
agreed, if you want humans to read it, don't use goto +1 –  Jodrell Jul 1 '11 at 9:45
2  
This is stupid: there are several cases were goto is useful, as illustrated by other answers. Either you rubut them explicitly, or just saying "it is wrong" is, well, wrong. –  Lohoris Sep 4 '13 at 14:29
    
@Lohoris I'm not buying it - every example I've seen where goto "improves readability" (including the answers here) would be far more readable after some simple refactoring. –  Justin Sep 4 '13 at 16:04
    
@Justin no, sometimes nested loops are just the most natural way of doing something, for instance if you are traversing an array of arrays. –  Lohoris Sep 4 '13 at 17:30

I don't remember ever using goto. But maybe it improves the intent of a forever loop that you really never want to exit (no break, but you can still return or throw):

forever: {
  // ...
  goto forever;
}

Then again, a simple while (true) should suffice...

Also, you could use in a situation where you want the first iteration of a loop to start in the middle of the loop: look here for an example.

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The processor implements at least one jump instruction and I'm sure lots of statements use those in thier implementation or interpretation.

One of the good things about using a 3rd or 4th generation langauge is that these physical details are abstracted away from us. Whilst we should be mindful of the law of leaky abstraction I think that we should also use our tools as they are intended (sorry). If I were writing code and a goto seemed like a good idea, it would be time to refactor. The purpose of a structured language is to avoid these "jumps" and to create a logical flow in our engineering.

I should avoid the use of break but I can't overlook the performance benefit. However, if I have nested loops that mutually need to break it is time to refactor.

If anybody can propose a use of goto that seems better than refactoring I will gladly withdraw my answer.

I hope I'm not guilty of rushing to the "bike shed" here. Like Kragen says, whats good enough for Dijkstra is good enough for me.

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1  
Taking a dynamic object and walking it's object graph that contains multiple dictionaries to get down to the values I need. Doesn't make sense to use methods that have a parameter of dynamic yet expect an exact object shape. With goto to break out multiple layers and continue walking through a collection of these objects. [I don't own the types so I can't provide better access, so reflection or dynamic it is] –  Chris Marisic Aug 20 '14 at 21:21

This link has great examples on goto: http://www.dotnetperls.com/goto

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Goto is never better. And continue, break (except in switch/case), (multiple) return, and throw should also be kept to the barest minimum. You never want to escape from the middle of nest loops. You always want the loop control statements have all the loop control. Indenting has information, and all these statement throw that information away. You might as well take out all the indenting.

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2  
You would want to break out of a loop if there is no point in keeping the execution of the loop. Otherwise you'll end up wasting more processing time in longer loops for no reason. –  Skuld Jan 3 '12 at 17:04
3  
@Kirk, this sounds like an opinion rather than anything quantitive? –  Brian Scott Jan 4 '12 at 8:42

It's particularly good when you have to clean up before returning from a method for example.

        while (stream.Read(buffer, 0, 4) == 4)
        {
            // do smth with the 4 bytes read here

            if (stream.Read(buffer, 0, 4) != 4) goto CLOSE_STREAM_AND_RETURN;

            // do more stuff

            if (stream.Read(buffer, 0, 4) != 4) goto CLOSE_STREAM_AND_RETURN;

            // more stuff
        }

        CLOSE_STREAM_AND_RETURN:

        stream.Close();

Inspired by: http://eli.thegreenplace.net/2009/04/27/using-goto-for-error-handling-in-c/

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5  
Either a using or try..finally statement would be much better suited here. –  Tim Rogers Mar 21 '14 at 9:20

I was looking at the .net source code and ran into this in the ControlStyle property for a WebControl

public Style ControlStyle
{
    get
    {
        if (this.controlStyle == null)
        {
            this.controlStyle = this.CreateControlStyle();
            if (base.IsTrackingViewState)
            {
                this.controlStyle.TrackViewState();
            }
            if (!this._webControlFlags[1])
            {
                goto IL_4D;
            }
            this._webControlFlags.Clear(1);
            this.controlStyle.LoadViewState(null);
        }
        IL_4D:
        return this.controlStyle;
    }
}

So even Microsoft uses it

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4  
That c# code is only reflected from IL, and gotos might be common in IL I suspect. If I look at the same method using Telerik JustDecompile I do not see that goto. So it's just how good your chosen reverse enginner tool is at rebuilding C# from IL. Also the name IL_4D suggests an auto generated label. –  weston Sep 13 '13 at 12:28
1  
@weston is right. See WebControl.cs at referencesource.microsoft.com. –  jnm2 Sep 11 '14 at 16:44

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