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If I have a rarely used collection in some class which may be instantiated many times, I may sometimes resort to the following "idiom" in order to save unnecessary object creations:

List<Object> list = null;

void add(Object object) {
    if (list == null)
        list = new ArrayList<Object>();

    list.add(object);
}

// somewhere else
if (list != null)
    for (Object object : list)
         ;

Now I was wondering if I couldn't eliminate those null checks using Collections.emptyList(), however then I would have to alter the if check in add() like so:

if (list == Collections.<Object>emptyList())
    list = new ArrayList<Object>();

Is there a better way to handle this other than just allocating a new empty collection every time?

EDIT: just to be clear, I would like to use Collections.emptyList(), but the above check in add() is really really ugly... I was wondering if there's a better way to do it or even a whole other way of handling this.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

in order to save unnecessary object creations

That's a really bad idea which will litter your code with == null checks and other handling of corner cases (and presumably end up in null pointer exceptions anyway)!

Now I was wondering if I couldn't eliminate those null checks using Collections.emptyList()

No, not really. emptyList() returns an empty list. You could do

if (list.equals(Collections.<Object>emptyList()))

but that will still throw a NullPointerException if list == null, so it's still not what you're after.

My recommendation: Always initialize the list to new ArrayList<Object>, or, if you for instance want to return an empty list from a method, use Collections.emptyList() instead. (This returns the same instance every time, so no unnecessary object creation there either.)

And then use .isEmpty() to check if a collection is empty or not.

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I want to, but you can't add objects to Collections.emptyList(), hence the check in add()... –  Philip K Jul 1 '11 at 10:45
2  
In those situations you should definitely go with new ArrayList<Object>() always. –  aioobe Jul 1 '11 at 10:47
1  
@Philip then use new ArrayList<Object>() along with .isEmpty(). –  Thomas Jul 1 '11 at 10:48
2  
I think you do have a great generalized idiom, and it's 'new ArrayList()'. It's going to be the rare specialized situation in which that costs you so much memory it really matters. –  Kevin Bourrillion Jul 1 '11 at 23:17
1  
@aioobe said list.equals(Collections.<Object>emptyList()) could throw NullPointerException if list == null. Couldn't you do Collections.<Object>emptyList().equals(list) then? –  Carcamano May 16 '12 at 16:17

emptyList() doesn't allocate an object each time.

I would create less of the object which contains the List so you can create the list every time.

What you can do is

private List<Object> list = Collections.emptyList();

private List<Object> listForWrite() {
    return list.isEmpty() ? list = new ArrayList<Object>() : list;
}


void add(Object object) {
    listForWrite().add(object);
}


// avoid creating an Iterator every time.
for (int i = 0, size = list.size(); i < size; i++) {
     ;
}
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That's a nice idea. Though now you're in for some thread-safety issues and synchronization overhead for every call to list() instead. –  aioobe Jul 1 '11 at 10:50
    
Regarding your edit: Now you might create new ArrayLists even though list already refers to a mutable list. –  aioobe Jul 1 '11 at 10:51
    
Yes, but then you would create a new ArrayList every time the list is empty (i.e. not only if it is indeed Collections.emptyList()), right? –  Philip K Jul 1 '11 at 10:52
    
If you are using ArrayList, you are going to have thread safety and synchronisation issues anyway. It only if the class needs to be thread safe and you are using a safe collection, its starts to matter. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 1 '11 at 10:52
    
@Philip K, That depends if you it is likely you will add entries and remove that all and add some more. Using a Iterator is likely to be far more expensive. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 1 '11 at 10:54

Here is what I use for a helper method in some of my code. Really works nicely in reducing the ton of null checks I'd normally have to place before iterating over lists. If you want a list that wouldn't be immutable then you can return a new list object instead of Collections.emptyList

/**
 * Helper method to return an empty list if provided one is null.
 *
 * @param list the list
 * @return the provided list or an empty one if it was null
 */
private static <T> List<T> emptyIfNull(List<T> list) {
    if (list == null) {
        return Collections.emptyList();
    }
    return list;
}

You then just use the helper method like so:

for (Object object : emptyIfNull(existingList)) { ... }

If the list object is null, then the helper method will return the static empty list and the contents of your loop will be skipped. This is a nice way to avoid having to create null checks wrapping any list iterations.

I've made the internals of the list be of type Object just for the example, but you'd obviously change this to be whatever makes the most sense for your usage.

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If you only use the list for iterations, you could just use: for (Object object : list) which wouldn't do anything for empty lists, i.e. not a single iteration.

Otherwise just check list.isEmpty().

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Not if he insists on letting null represent empty collections. –  aioobe Jul 1 '11 at 10:43
    
@aioobe You're right, but then using Collections.emptyList() wouldn't get you any advantage, would it? –  Thomas Jul 1 '11 at 10:46

You can create a utility class with static methods, like:

public class ListUtil {

/**
 * Checks if {@link List} is null or empty.
 *
 * @param <E> the generic type
 * @param list the list
 * @return true, if is null or empty
 */
public static <E> boolean isNullOrEmpty(List<E> list) {
    return list == null || list.size() == 0;
}

/**
 * Checks if {@link List} is not null and empty.
 *
 * @param <E> the generic type
 * @param list the list
 * @return true, if is not null and empty
 */
public static <E> boolean isNotNullAndEmpty(List<E> list) {
    return list != null && list.size() != 0;
}

}

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3  
Actually, apache commons collections already has such a utility class: CollectionUtils –  Thomas Jul 1 '11 at 10:47
    
@Thomas Thank you. I was not aware of it. :) –  Tapas Bose Jul 1 '11 at 10:49
    
That's not what I was after, I don't want to replace == null with isNullOrEmpty(), I don't want any checks when I iterate over the list. –  Philip K Jul 1 '11 at 10:54

I find it easiest to follow this convention:

  1. If the point of my methods is to return a Collection, the method never returns null. Null is ambiguous. Instead I return Collection.emptyXXX() or ImmutableXXX.of() if using Guava.

  2. If I have an object which is maintaining an internal list as a member, instantiate it in the constructor. I try not to do lazy instantiation unless I can prove its a significant gain because lazy code, in my opinion, tends to be more difficult to debug when issues arise.

I really see immutable or unmodifiable empty collections being a part of a contract external to objects. If you are using the collection internally, I can only really see using immutable collections if you have a good reason (concurrency, consistency, immutability of the object)

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