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Given the following code, will ixAdd do what you'd expect, i. e. return the value of ix before the increment, but increment the class member before leaving the function?

class myCounter {
    private int _ix = 1;

    public int ixAdd()
    {
        return _ix++;
    }
}

I wasn't quite sure if the usual rules for post / pre increment would also apply in return statements, when the program leaves the stack frame (or whatever it is in Java) of the function.

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1  
Why don't you try it? –  Paul Tomblin Mar 17 '09 at 15:22
    
ehm.. you mean, like paste the code above in my editor and run it? I don't know, sorry. :-p I'll go get myself a cup of coffee... –  Hanno Fietz Mar 17 '09 at 15:25
    
voted for close... I thought the author could just close it immediately? –  Hanno Fietz Mar 17 '09 at 15:26
1  
Hey, now I know why I didn't try: To get Jon Skeet's answer. It's actually more useful than the question. –  Hanno Fietz Mar 17 '09 at 15:29
    
@PT funny how it would have been easy to just try :) –  mP. Aug 26 '11 at 10:43
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5 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The key part is that a post increment/decrement happens immediately after the expression is evaluated. Not only does it happen before the return occurs - it happens before any later expressions are evaluated. For instance, suppose you wrote:

class myCounter {
    private int _ix = 1;

    public int ixAdd()
    {
        return _ix++ + giveMeZero();
    }

    public int giveMeZero()
    {
        System.out.println(_ix);
        return 0;
    }
}

That would print out the incremented result as well, because the increment happens before giveMeZero() is called.

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Thanks for the answer, Jon. As Paul Tomblin pointed out, typing the code in my editor instead of the post would have answered it, too. But now I got more out of it than I asked for. –  Hanno Fietz Mar 17 '09 at 15:31
    
@Jon: For people coming from C to Java (which will be a lot of people), this is a good thing to point out. As a long time Java user who first used C for a long, long time, I didn't know that Java defined how ++ works so much more clearly than C does. I learned to avoid "clever" ++ use from C! –  Eddie Mar 17 '09 at 15:37
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Well, let's look at the bytecode (use javap -c <classname> to see it yourself):

Compiled from "PostIncTest.java"
class myCounter extends java.lang.Object{
myCounter();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial	#1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   aload_0
   5:   iconst_1
   6:   putfield	#2; //Field _ix:I
   9:   return

public int ixAdd();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   dup
   2:   getfield	#2; //Field _ix:I
   5:   dup_x1
   6:   iconst_1
   7:   iadd
   8:   putfield	#2; //Field _ix:I
   11:  ireturn

}

As you can see, instructions 6 and 7 in ixAdd() handle the increment before the return. Therefore, as we would expect, the decrement operator does indeed have an effect when used in a return statement. Notice, however, that there is a dup instruction before these two appear; the incremented value is (of course) not reflected in the return value.

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Hey, that's probably more than the question deserved. Nice one! –  Hanno Fietz Mar 17 '09 at 15:37
    
I like bytecode. :) –  Michael Myers Mar 17 '09 at 15:40
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Yes, the usual rules apply for post increment even on a return statement. Basically, what it will do at a low level is store the return value into a register, then increment the class member, then return from the method.

You can see this in a later answer to this question that showed the byte code.

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Yes, it does.

But don't do that, it is bad style to have side effects in expressions.

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The side effect here is very much intended and I can't see it do any harm. –  Hanno Fietz Mar 17 '09 at 15:35
    
But it makes it hard to understand, as your question shows. –  starblue Mar 17 '09 at 15:39
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It does return the value before the increment, and then increment _ix. Therefore the first time you call the method ixAdd on an instance of myCounter it will return 1, the second time it will return 2, and so on.

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