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What kind of mechanism is used to update an object... unless we are constantly checking it has changed and then instruct the Subject/Observed to push his state...

What I mean is for instance an Object changes state, how should it handle this change, should it simply mark itself as changed, but how do I let Observers know that it has changed without having to always be checking if the object that I am observing has changed or not... how do we handle unexpected changes and eliminate them from our notifications?

There is this whole callback thing, event listeners, etc... that I use but don't really understand, I use it as a black box, but I really would like to know a bit more about the internals of such mechanisms.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a lot of different mechanisms to track changes of an object.

The first alternative is to use indeed observers. This implies that every method that changes data in your object, calls the observers. In practice it's best to put this in one function, like this:

class MyClass
   {
   public:
      void setValue(int value)
         {
         m_value = value;
         notifyObservers();
         }
   private:
      void notifyObservers()
         {
         for (auto it=m_observers.begin();it!=m_observers.end();++it)
            (*it)->notify(this);
         }
      std::list<Observer *> m_observers;
   };

An alternative is to store whether the object has been changed. However, this requires you to define the meaning of "has been changed"; in other words: when do I reset the 'changed' flag. An easy solution is to use a version number. Whenever the object changes, you increase the version number, like this:

class MyClass
   {
   public:
      void setValue(int value)
         {
         m_value = value;
         ++m_version;
         }
      int getVersion() const
         {
         return m_version;
         }
   private:
      int m_version;
   };

Now other classes can simply request the version number and use it to see whether it has been changed since they last asked for the version number.

Both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages:

  • In the observer mechanism, changes can be slow (since you need to call all observers), but you are guaranteed that all observers will be immediately up-ot-date
  • In the version-number approach, changes are very fast, but you rely on the other classes to regularly query your class for changes

Which mechanism is the best in your case depends on the situation. If found that in practice it's best to mix them, depending on the situation. Some changes are best propagated immediately (e.g. in calculations), other changes are best delayed (e.g. updating your screen).

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basically Observer pattern says that there is an object that is a subject of interest of other objects.
Let's say for example, we have a Kid object, who has properties such as MathGrade, GeographyGrade etc..
Now, objects Mother, Father, Principal are all interested in changes of the Kid object's properties.
They have basically 2 options-

  1. coming up to the Kid every day and ask 'has your MathGrade changed?' 'has your GeographyGrade changed?' etc.
    that approach is not very efficient.

  2. they can just say to the Kid- 'OK, here's my number- call me if your MathGrade changes'.
    that is essentially the Observer pattern: whoever is interested in changes to the object registers themselves with that object, and is guaranteed to be notified whenever a change occurs.

And if to get back to the programming world- you would have an IGradeObserver interface, which will declare a MathGradeChanged(int newGrade), GeorgraphyGradeChanged(int newGrade) functions.
The classes Mother, Father, and Principal would implement IGradeObserver.
Now, the Kid class will have a list of IGradeObservers, and a RegisterObserver(IGradeObserver observer) method.

Now, whenever a grade changes, the Kid class would iterate through its Observers list, and notify them of that change.

callbacks and event listeners are one way of implementing this pattern.
I suggest googling this, I've found a couple of interesting guides myself (here, and here).
I'm sure you can find some others as well, also pertaining to the programming language of your choice.
good luck.

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It's n that I don't understand the concepts. It's the mechanics that confuse me, specially if you have to handle unexpected data changes and you have no trigger mechanism, like pressing of a btn, querying a server, etc... unless you have a trigger mechanism how do you know that something has changed? Unless you are always checking... or the object is self-conscious of it's state at all times, and this is something that confuses me, hoe can the object be self-conscious? Thanks for the reply though and the links I will study them with more attention. I am rereading HFDP it raises some confusion –  Dan Mendes Jul 1 '11 at 12:28
    
@Adam yes- the object is aware of it's state at all times. If to continue on my example, the Kid would know when its properties have changed, right? So that's when it'll notify its Observers. It's like that for all objects, because in order to change the state of an object you have to invoke an operation on it. So this is how the object is 'self conscious', as you put it. –  sJhonny Jul 1 '11 at 12:40
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