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I am trying to get DateTime to out todays date in %d/%m-%Y' format, but I get undef.

What am I doing wrong?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

use DateTime ();
use DateTime::Format::Strptime;

my $now   = DateTime->now;

my $p = DateTime::Format::Strptime->new(
    pattern     => '%d/%m-%Y',
    time_zone   => 'UTC',
    );

my $dt = $p->parse_datetime($now);

print Dumper $dt;
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1  
I think you're trying to parse the time, from $now, while you want the opposite. –  Alex Jul 1 '11 at 11:49
1  
yes, strftime stands for string format time, strptime stands for string parse time –  ysth Jul 1 '11 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It could be written as simple as:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use DateTime ();

my $now = DateTime->now( 'time_zone' => 'UTC' );
print $now->strftime('%d/%m-%Y');
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What does the () in use DateTime (); actually do? I have seen it several times. –  Sandra Schlichting Jul 1 '11 at 11:54
4  
The () explicitly states that the @EXPORT -s (if any) of DateTime should not be imported. For example, if DateTime @EXPORT -ed a function named end_of_world_time and use DateTime (); is in effect, to invoke the function, one will have to qualify the function with its package name: DateTime::end_of_world_time. However, if you use DateTime;, you will be able to invoke the function by calling: end_of_world_time without the need for qualifying it with its package name. –  Alan Haggai Alavi Jul 1 '11 at 12:02
1  
Very useful. Thanks. –  Sandra Schlichting Jul 1 '11 at 12:08
1  
You are welcome. :-) You can learn more by reading perldoc -f use. –  Alan Haggai Alavi Jul 1 '11 at 12:08
1  
That's not the point. Empty import list is just a special case of the style decision to always declare the import. I should really get around writing a Critic policy for that. Reasons: ① You document where a subroutine comes from. Imagine having 20 use statements and now first you need to find out where it's from in order to look it up in the documentation. ② The import subroutine can do all sorts of side effects, not only importing symbols. It's a good idea to minimise side effects unless you really want/need them. –  daxim Jul 1 '11 at 12:26

Generally DateTime formatters will both parse a string to and format a string from a DateTime object. ->parse_datetime will give you a DateTime object from a string, and ->format_datetime will give you a string from a DateTime object. When you have a formatter you want to use to both deserialize and reserialize your dates, you can use it in a few different ways:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

use DateTime;
use DateTime::Format::Strptime;

use 5.012;

my $now = DateTime->now(time_zone => 'local');
say $now; ### '2011-07-01T08:22:03' - converted to string with default formatter

my $p = DateTime::Format::Strptime->new(
    pattern     => '%d/%m-%Y',
    time_zone   => 'UTC',
    );
say $p->format_datetime($now); ### use the parser against a DateTime
                               ### '01/07-2011'

$now->set_formatter($p); ### Set the parser as the default string 
                         ### formatter for the DateTime object
say $now; ### '01/07-2011' -- from formatter

### Or set it at object construction
my $now2 = DateTime->now( time_zone => 'local',
                          formatter => $p,
                        );
say $now2; ### '01/07-2011' - from formatter
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