Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Why does this work:

self.array = newArray;

But this doesn't:

[[self mutableArray] addObject:object];

Meaning, why do I need to init the NSMutableArray for it to work when I don't have to init the NSArray?

EDIT: Hops this is clearer guys.

Interface:

@interface Foo : UIViewController {

}

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSArray *array;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableArray *mutableArray;

@end

Implementation:

@implementation Foo

@synthesize array;
@synthesize mutableArray;

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    self.array = [Class returningAnArray];
    [[self mutableArray] addObject:objectIHaveOmittedTheCode];
}

@end
share|improve this question
    
The code you provided does not work by itself, and the question makes no sense, please clarify or this post will be closed. – Joe Jul 1 '11 at 12:39
    
There's not enough information there to make a determination about either case. How is newArray created? What is self, and does it have a mutableArray method? If so, what does it return? If it's a property, has it been initialized? Finally, what are you really trying to accomplish? – Caleb Jul 1 '11 at 12:39
    
I see your edit but the implementation doesn't match the interface. Please edit again. – Richard Brightwell Jul 1 '11 at 12:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted
self.array = newArray;

In this line, you are assigning already created object to self.array. So, you've no need to create it.

[[self mutableArray] addObject:object];

But in this line you are trying to add an object to a array which is not created actually. If you don't create the array, it will be nil, and sending message to nil won't take any effect.

share|improve this answer

In Objective-C NSArray objects are immutable.

self.array = newArray;

This line is a property assignment. The self.array property returns a reference pointing to a location in memory that contains an NSArray object. By assigning the property to different objects you're not really modifying the object themselves.

If you wish to modify an existing NSArray object, you'll have to create a NSMutableArray object containing the same elements:

NSMutableArray *mutableArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithArray:self.array];
[mutableArray addObject:object];

Note that NSMutableArray inherits from NSArray, so you can safely assign the object referenced by mutableArray to any variable of type NSArray.

share|improve this answer
2  
Just to be clear, it's actually an assignment to a property. There may or may not be a variable named array in self. – Caleb Jul 1 '11 at 12:43

[Class returningArray] did the allocation for you. Every object needs to be allocated (and should be initialized) before it can used. The solution is.

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    self.array = [Class returningAnArray];
    self.mutableArray = [NSMutableArray array];
    //Now you can use mutable array
    [[self mutableArray] addObject:objectIHaveOmittedTheCode];
}

Now you have created your array and your mutable array with out explicitly calling alloc on either because those classes have done it for you.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.