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If you were going to store a user agent in a database, how large would you accomdate for?

I found this technet article which recommends keeping UA under 200. It doesn't look like this is defined in the HTTP specification at least not that I found. My UA is already 149 characters, and it seems like each version of .net will be adding to it.

I know I can parse the string out and break it down but I'd rather not.


EDIT
Based on this Blog IE9 will be changing to send the short UA string. This is a good change.


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I posted this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/17731699/… –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Jul 18 '13 at 18:56
    
What is your UA string? I found only some strings with 137 characters in my database (which is not too big). –  moose Jul 17 at 18:36
    
When I asked this question five years ago or so. UA strings were getting long they included lots of extra stuff... –  JoshBerke Jul 19 at 19:23

10 Answers 10

up vote 58 down vote accepted

HTTP specification does not limit length of headers at all. However web-servers do limit header size they accept, throwing 413 Entity Too Large if it exceeds.

Depending on web-server and their settings these limits vary from 4KB to 64KB (total for all headers).

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7  
Apache limits the maximum field length to 8k (httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/core.html#limitrequestfieldsize). –  Gumbo Mar 17 '09 at 17:11
    
I'm less concerned with server limits since I am on IIS, I know it won't ever be bigger then their limit which is still preety large if memory serves.... –  JoshBerke Mar 17 '09 at 18:42
5  
@Josh -- memory serves you well, on IIS it's 16K by default. ;-) –  vartec Mar 17 '09 at 21:11
    
Which I better not get a 16k user agent.... –  JoshBerke Mar 18 '09 at 2:08

Since it's for database purposes and there is no practical limit i'd go for a UserAgents Table with UserAgentId as Int and UserAgentString as NVarChar(MAX) and use a foreign key on the original table.

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1  
Interesting idea, I never thought of normalizing it...makes sense... –  JoshBerke Mar 17 '09 at 16:30
15  
You would probably end up with user agents on a 1-to-a-handful relationship with your users. Most user agents get so tweaked by the items a user has installed, and in a particular order, that they are almost personally identifiable (one other answer has a good example of this happening). In fact, the EFF did a study (pdf) about it. –  patridge Mar 8 '11 at 20:29
1  
@patridge +1 for link, very good study. It's a bit off topic because they look at several fingerprints and not only the user agent strings. In a real world scenario, for a site that gets several million page views per month you would end up with a few thousand user agent string, so normalizing makes sense IMHO. With that said, I'm not very positive on storing user agent strings in the database :P –  Diadistis Mar 9 '11 at 6:07

My take on this:

  • Use a dedicated table to store only UserAgents (normalize it)
  • In your related tables, store an Foreign Key value to point back to the UserAgent auto-increment primary key field
  • Store the actual UserAgent string in a TEXT field and care not about the length
  • Have another UNIQUE BINARY(32) (or 64, or 128 depending on your hash length) and hash the UserAgent

Some UA strings can get obscenely long. This should spare you the worries. Also enforce a maximum length in your INSERTer to keep UA strings it under 4KB. Unless someone is emailing you in the user-agent, it should not go over that length.

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1  
TEXT field should not be used anymore as stated in MSDN : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187993(v=sql.90).aspx Instead, use NVARCHAR(MAX). Source: stackoverflow.com/questions/564755/… –  Matt Roy Aug 14 '13 at 14:54
1  
My database has 10,235 distinct user agent strings. I wanted to find the fastest hash algorithm that didn't produce any collisions. For my PHP environment I found md5 performed quickly at 2.3 seconds with no collisions. Interestingly I tried crc32 and crc32b and they also performed at 2.3 seconds with no collisions. But, because md5 has more combinations than crc32 and crc32b, md5 would likely have fewer possible collisions. Anyway, md5 is my choice and I expect it will work fine. –  noctufaber Aug 13 at 18:24

Noticed something like this in our apache logs. It looks abnormal to me but I regularly see such things in logs mostly from Windows systems.

Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 6.0; Trident/4.0; (R1 1.6); SLCC1; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; InfoPath.2; OfficeLiveConnector.1.3; OfficeLivePatch.0.0; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30618; 66760635803; runtime 11.00294; 876906799603; 97880703; 669602703; 9778063903; 877905603; 89670803; 96690803; 8878091903; 7879040603; 999608065603; 799808803; 6666059903; 669602102803; 888809342903; 696901603; 788907703; 887806555703; 97690214703; 66760903; 968909903; 796802422703; 8868026703; 889803611803; 898706903; 977806408603; 976900799903; 9897086903; 88780803; 798802301603; 9966008603; 66760703; 97890452603; 9789064803; 96990759803; 99960107703; 8868087903; 889801155603; 78890703; 8898070603; 89970603; 89970539603; 89970488703; 8789007603; 87890903; 877904603; 9887077703; 798804903; 97890264603; 967901703; 87890703; 97690420803; 79980706603; 9867086703; 996602846703; 87690803; 6989010903; 977809603; 666601903; 876905337803; 89670603; 89970200903; 786903603; 696901911703; 788905703; 896709803; 96890703; 998601903; 88980703; 666604769703; 978806603; 7988020803; 996608803; 788903297903; 98770043603; 899708803; 66960371603; 9669088903; 69990703; 99660519903; 97780603; 888801803; 9867071703; 79780803; 9779087603; 899708603; 66960456803; 898706824603; 78890299903; 99660703; 9768079803; 977901591603; 89670605603; 787903608603; 998607934903; 799808573903; 878909603; 979808146703; 9996088603; 797803154903; 69790603; 99660565603; 7869028603; 896707703; 97980965603; 976907191703; 88680703; 888809803; 69690903; 889805523703; 899707703; 997605035603; 89970029803; 9699094903; 877906803; 899707002703; 786905857603; 69890803; 97980051903; 997603978803; 9897097903; 66960141703; 7968077603; 977804603; 88980603; 989700803; 999607887803; 78690772803; 96990560903; 98970961603; 9996032903; 9699098703; 69890655603; 978903803; 698905066803; 977806903; 9789061703; 967903747703; 976900550903; 88980934703; 8878075803; 8977028703; 97980903; 9769006603; 786900803; 98770682703; 78790903; 878906967903; 87690399603; 99860976703; 796805703; 87990603; 968906803; 967904724603; 999606603; 988705903; 989702842603; 96790603; 99760703; 88980166703; 9799038903; 98670903; 697905248603; 7968043603; 66860703; 66860127903; 9779048903; 89670123903; 78890397703; 97890603; 87890803; 8789030603; 69990603; 88880763703; 9769000603; 96990203903; 978900405903; 7869022803; 699905422903; 97890703; 87990903; 878908703; 7998093903; 898702507603; 97780637603; 966907903; 896702603; 9769004803; 7869007903; 99660158803; 7899099603; 8977055803; 99660603; 7889080903; 66660981603; 997604603; 6969089803; 899701903; 9769072703; 666603903; 99860803; 997608803; 69790903; 88680756703; 979805677903; 9986047703; 89970803; 66660603; 96690903; 8997051603; 789901209803; 8977098903; 968900326803; 87790703; 98770024803; 697901794603; 69990803; 887805925803; 968908903; 97880603; 897709148703; 877909476903; 66760197703; 977908603; 698902703; 988706504803; 977802026603; 88680964703; 8878068703; 987705107903; 978902878703; 8898069803; 9768031703; 79680803; 79980803; 669609328703; 89870238703; 99960593903; 969904218703; 78890603; 9788000703; 69690630903; 889800982903; 988709748803; 7968052803; 99960007803; 969900800803; 668604817603; 66960903; 78790734603; 8868007703; 79780034903; 8878085903; 976907603; 89670830803; 877900903; 969904889703; 7978033903; 8987043903; 99860703; 979805903; 667603803; 976805348603; 999604127603; 97790701603; 78990342903; 98770672903; 87990253903; 9877027703; 97790803; 877901895603; 8789076903; 896708595603; 997601903; 799806903; 97690603; 87790371703; 667605603; 99760303703; 97680283803; 788902750803; 787909803; 79780603; 79880866903; 9986050903; 87890543903; 979800803; 97690179703; 876901603; 699909903; 96990192603; 878904903; 877904734903; 796801446903; 977904803; 9887044803; 797805565603; 98870789703; 7869093903; 87790727703; 797801232803; 666604803; 9778071903; 9799086703; 6969000903; 89670903; 8799075903; 897708903; 88680903; 97980362603; 97980503903; 889803256703; 88980388703; 789909376803; 69690703; 6969025903; 89970309903; 96690703; 877901847803; 968901903; 96690603; 88680607603; 7889001703; 789904761803; 976807703; 976902903; 878907889703; 9897014903; 896707046603; 696909903; 666603998903; 969902703; 79680421803; 9769075603; 798800192703; 97990903; 9689024903; 668604803; 969908671903; 9996094703; 69990642703; 97890895903; 977805619903; 79980859903; 88980443803; 98970649603; 997602703; 888802169903; 699907803; 667602028803; 786903283903; 997607703; 969909803; 798809925903; 9976045603; 97790903; 9789001903; 966903603; 9789069603; 968906603; 6989091803; 896701603; 6979059803; 978803903; 997606362603; 88980803; 98970803; 88880921703; 8997065703; 899700703; 698908703; 797801027903; 7889050903; 87890603; 78690703; 99660069703; 97980309903; 976800603; 666606803; 898707703; 79880019803; 66960250803; 7978049803; 88780602603; 79680903; 88880792703; 96990903; 667608603; 87790730903; 98970903; 9699032903; 8987004803; 88880703; 89770046603; 978800803; 969908903; 9798022603; 696901903; 799803703; 989703703; 668605903; 79780903; 998601371703; 796803339703; 87890922603; 898708903; 9966061903; 66960891903; 96790903; 8779050803; 98870858803; 976909298603; 9887029903; 669608703; 979806903; 878903803; 99960703; 9789086703; 979801803; 66960008703; 979806830803; 99760212703; 786906603; 797807603; 789907297703; 96990703; 786901603; 796807766603; 896702651603; 789902585603; 66660925903; 9986085703; 66960302703; 69890703; 789900703; 89970903; 9679060703; 9789002903; 979908821603; 986708140803; 976809828703; 7988082803; 79680997903; 99960803; 9788081903; 979805703; 787908603; 66960602803; 9887098703; 978803237703; 888806804603; 999604703; 977904703; 966904635703; 97680291703; 977809345603; 8878046703; 988709803; 976900773603; 989703903; 88780198603; 87790603; 986708703; 78890604703; 87790544803; 976809850903; 887806703; 987707527603; 79880803; 9897059603; 897709820603; 97880804803; 66960026703; 9789062803; 9867090803; 669600603; 8967087703; 78890903; 89770903; 97980703; 976802687603; 66860400803; 979901288603; 96990160903; 99860228903; 966900703; 66760603; 9689035703; 9779064703; 7968023603; 87890791903; 98770870603; 9798005803; 6969087903; 9779097903; 6979065703; 699903252603; 79780989703; 87690901803; 978905763903; 977809703; 97790369703; 899703269603; 8878012703; 78790803; 87690395603; 8888042803; 667607689903; 8977041803; 6666085603; 6999080703; 69990797803; 88680721603; 99660519803; 889807603; 87890146703; 699906325903; 89770603; 669608615903; 9779028803; 88880603; 97790703; 79780703; 97680355603; 6696024803; 78790784703; 97880329903; 9699077703; 89870803; 79680227903; 976905852703; 8997098903; 896704796703; 66860598803; 9897036703; 66960703; 9699094703; 9699008703; 97780485903; 999603179903; 89770834803; 96790445603; 79680460903; 9867009603; 89870328703; 799801035803; 989702903; 66960758903; 66860150803; 6686088603; 9877092803; 96990603; 99860603; 987703663603; 98870903; 699903325603; 87790803; 97680703; 8868030703; 9799030803; 89870703; 97680803; 9669054803; 6979097603; 987708046603; 999608603; 878904803; 998607408903; 968903903; 696900703; 977907491703; 6686033803; 669601803; 99960290603; 887809169903; 979803703; 69890903; 699901447903; 8987064903; 799800603; 98770903; 8997068703; 967903603; 66760146803; 978805087903; 697908138603; 799801603; 88780964903; 989708339903; 8967048603; 88880981603; 789909703; 796806603; 977905977603; 989700603; 97780703; 9669062603; 88980714603; 897709545903; 988701916703; 667604694903; 786905664603; 877900803; 886805490903; 89970559903; 99960531803; 7998033903; 98770803; 78890418703; 669600872803; 996605216603; 78690962703; 667604903; 996600903; 999608903; 9699083803; 787901803; 97780707603; 787905312703; 977805803; 8977033703; 97890708703; 989705521903; 978800703; 698905703; 78890376903; 878907703; 999602903; 986705903; 668602719603; 979901803; 997606903; 66760393903; 987703603; 78790338903; 96890803; 97680596803; 666601603; 977902178803; 877902803; 78790038603; 8868075703; 99960060603)

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17  
Is there anyone that would like to comment on what on earth is going on with this user agent? lol I must add, I am curious how such a beast can form. –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Jul 30 '12 at 20:41
6  
If anyone is curious; this one clocks in at 8010 chars. How could anyone on the browser team have thought that this was a good idea? It's as mad as a bag of cats! –  Doctor Jones Jul 17 '13 at 15:04
1  
Does truncating this user agent string at 256 or 512 get rid of any data that is useful at all? –  JackAce May 12 at 16:24

How's this for big?:

Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 5.1; Trident/4.0; YPC 3.2.0; SearchSystem6829992239; SearchSystem9616306563; SearchSystem6017393645; SearchSystem5219240075; SearchSystem2768350104; SearchSystem6919669052; SearchSystem1986739074; SearchSystem1555480186; SearchSystem3376893470; SearchSystem9530642569; SearchSystem4877790286; SearchSystem8104932799; SearchSystem2313134663; SearchSystem1545325372; SearchSystem7742471461; SearchSystem9092363703; SearchSystem6992236221; SearchSystem3507700306; SearchSystem1129983453; SearchSystem1077927937; SearchSystem2297142691; SearchSystem7813572891; SearchSystem5668754497; SearchSystem6220295595; SearchSystem4157940963; SearchSystem7656671655; SearchSystem2865656762; SearchSystem6520604676; SearchSystem4960161466; .NET CLR 1.1.4322; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; Hotbar 10.2.232.0; SearchSystem9616306563; SearchSystem6017393645; SearchSystem5219240075; SearchSystem2768350104; SearchSystem6919669052; SearchSystem1986739074; SearchSystem1555480186; SearchSystem3376893470; SearchSystem9530642569; SearchSystem4877790286; SearchSystem8104932799; SearchSystem2313134663; SearchSystem1545325372; SearchSystem7742471461; SearchSystem9092363703; SearchSystem6992236221; SearchSystem3507700306; SearchSystem1129983453; SearchSystem1077927937; SearchSystem2297142691; SearchSystem7813572891; SearchSystem5668754497; SearchSystem6220295595; SearchSystem4157940963; SearchSystem7656671655; SearchSystem2865656762; SearchSystem6520604676; SearchSystem4960161466; .NET CLR 3.0.4506.2152; .NET CLR 3.5.30729)

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10  
For those keeping score, that's 1546 characters, including the leading and trailing quotes. –  Doug Harris May 12 '10 at 13:26
2  
This is a good example, but not much of an answer. –  Yuck Mar 19 '13 at 10:58

I'll give you the standard answer:

Take the largest possible value you can possibly imagine it being, double it, and that's your answer.

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heh so how large do you think it will be? –  JoshBerke Mar 17 '09 at 16:15
1  
I find it funny whenever we don't know what a good length would be we always end up with 256 or another multiple of 2. –  JoshBerke Mar 17 '09 at 16:17
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It compresses well! –  Ed Marty Mar 17 '09 at 16:23
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Well 512 sounds good that gives me at least 10 years of .net releases and other junk to accumulate and by then I hope to be retired. Thanks again –  JoshBerke Mar 17 '09 at 16:29
1  
@Josh: "by then I hope to be retired"... where have I heard that before?! ;-) –  Cerebrus Mar 17 '09 at 17:04

There is no stated limit, only the limit of most HTTP servers. Keeping that in mind however, I would implement a column with a reasonable fixed length (use Google to find a list of known user agents, find the largest and add 50%), and just crop any user agent that is too long - any exceptionally long user agent is probably unique enough even when cropped, or is the result of some kind of bug or "hack" attempt.

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I got this user agent today, overflowing our vendor's storage field:

Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 5.1; Trident/4.0; GTB6; .NET CLR 1.1.4322; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.0.04506.30; MDDR; OfficeLiveConnector.1.3; OfficeLivePatch.0.0; .NET CLR 3.0.4506.2152; .NET CLR 3.5.30729)

Ridiculous! 229 chars?

So take that size, double it, double it again, and you should be set until Microsoft's next blunder (maybe this time next year).

Go bigger than 1000!

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Shesh...this is exactly what I was talking about.... –  JoshBerke Jun 5 '09 at 18:53

Here is one that is 257

Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 5.1; Trident/4.0; GTB6; .NET CLR 1.1.4322; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.0.04506.30; InfoPath.2; .NET CLR 3.0.04506.648; OfficeLiveConnector.1.3; OfficeLivePatch.0.0; .NET CLR 3.0.4506.2152; .NET CLR 3.5.30729)

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I've seen up to 255 characters so far on a very very low traffic site. So not surprising. .Net 4.0 will probally add another 20 chars as well. –  JoshBerke Aug 7 '09 at 15:41

Assume the user agent string has no limit on its length and prepare to store such a value. As you've seen, length is unpredictable.

In Postgres, there's a text type that accepts strings of unlimited length. Use that.

Most likely though, you'll have to start truncating at some point. Call it good at a reasonably useful increment (200, 1k, 4k) and throw away the rest.

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