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I know what changed. I know why. But..

TComplicatedCallMaker = record
    Param1: TRecordType;
    Param2: TRecordType;
    {...}
    Param15: TRecordType;
    procedure Call;
end;

function ComplicatedCall: TComplicatedCallMaker;
begin
 { Fill default param values }
end;

procedure DoingSomeWorkHere;
begin
  with ComplicatedCall do begin
    Param7 := Value7;
    Param12 := Value12;
    Call;
  end;
end;

This has perfectly worked before Delphi 2010. An extremely useful technique for making calls which accept a load of parameters but usually only need two or three. Never the same ones though.

And now it gives... guess what?

E2064: Left side cannot be assigned to.

Can't this helpful new behavior be disabled somehow? Any ideas on how to modify the pattern so it works?

Because seriously, losing such a handy technique (and rewriting a bunch of code) for no apparent reason...

share|improve this question
    
    
I'm very surprised that ever worked. –  David Heffernan Jul 1 '11 at 15:01
    
@David Hefferman: Why? It's a perfectly valid trick. No hacking, just language features. –  himself Jul 1 '11 at 15:02
8  
It was removed because it was never supposed to be allowed in the first place. –  Rob Kennedy Jul 1 '11 at 15:11
    
I don't get the comparison of this question with the what changed reference. Especially since properties always behaved the way as that topic describes, it never "changed". –  NGLN Jul 1 '11 at 18:26

2 Answers 2

I find it a little surprising that this ever worked but since you say it did I'm sure you are right. I'd guess the change was made without consideration for record methods. Without the ability to call methods then this construct would be rather pointless.

Anyway, the compiler isn't going to let you off the hook on this one so you'll have to do this:

type
  TRecordType = record end;
  TComplicatedCallMaker = record
    Param1: TRecordType;
    procedure Call;
  end;

function ComplicatedCall: TComplicatedCallMaker;
begin
 { Fill default param values }
end;

procedure DoingSomeWorkHere(const Value: TRecordType);
var
  CallMaker: TComplicatedCallMaker;
begin
  CallMaker := ComplicatedCall;
  with CallMaker do begin
    Param1 := Value;
    Call;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I tried that straight away too and it works. But this kills half the beauty... are there really no other ways? –  himself Jul 1 '11 at 15:09
    
You could use an instance of a class but then you'd have to free it –  David Heffernan Jul 1 '11 at 15:15
    
Yup, and it's way slower than (probably stack-allocated!) return records. –  himself Jul 1 '11 at 15:23
1  
There was no beauty here to kill. It's all pure ugly hack that previously relied on a broken compiler. The compiler is fixed now. –  Warren P Jul 1 '11 at 16:59
1  
@Warren P: No it's not. Hacking is working against the compiler. This trick relied on documented, expected behavior. Say what you want, although this usage was unexpected to compiler developers, it was legit. Unexpected usage != hacking. In fact, trying to limit what you can do to stuff explicitly stated you can do is killing the otherwise rich language. –  himself Jul 1 '11 at 17:53

I... think I did it

I hope Delphi developers see what they make their programmers do!

type
  PCallMaker = ^TCallMaker;
  TCallMaker = record
    Param1: integer;
    Param2: integer;
    function This: PCallMaker; inline;
    procedure Call; inline;
  end;

function TCallMaker.This: PCallMaker;
begin
  Result := @Self;
 { Record functions HAVE to have correct self-pointer,
  or they wouldn’t be able to modify data. }
end;

procedure TCallMaker.Call;
begin
  writeln(Param1, ' ', Param2);
end;

function CallMaker: TCallMaker; inline
begin
  Result.Param1 := 0;
  Result.Param2 := 0;
end;

procedure DoingSomeWorkHere;
var cm: TCallMaker;
begin
 {Test the assumption that cm is consistent}
  cm := CallMaker;
  if cm.This <> @cm then
    raise Exception.Create('This wasn''t our lucky day.');

 {Make a call}
  with CallMaker.This^ do begin
    Param1 := 100;
    Param2 := 500;
    Call;
  end;
end;

This works, preserves all the good points of the old version (speed, simplicity, small call overhead) but aren't there any hidden problems with this approach?

share|improve this answer
    
With this solution you'll have to change all usages of CallMaker anyway. So I'd suggest that you go the whole way and use an explicit variable like @David suggested. You won't notice any overhead and get rid of the ambiguity with introduces. –  Uli Gerhardt Jul 1 '11 at 17:53
1  
This looks simply terrible. What are you trying to achieve? –  David Heffernan Jul 1 '11 at 17:56
3  
Why don't you pass everything in to the function in a record? Why fight the language? –  David Heffernan Jul 1 '11 at 18:27
1  
This relies on the assumption that the temporary returned by CallMaker will live through the end of the enclosing with block. Find that guarantee documented somewhere, and I think you have your solution. Without that guarantee, you're no better off than you were before Delphi 2010, relying on a technicality of the compiler. –  Rob Kennedy Jul 1 '11 at 19:52
1  
@Rob Kennedy: Unfortunately you're right. The only way to not rely on implementation is probably "with CallMaker with This^ begin ... end; Call; end". This way Delphi can't release CallMaker until Call() executes. –  himself Jul 3 '11 at 6:59

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