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How to set process group of a shell script ? Also I want all the child process to be in the same process group

I expect something similar to setpgid() in C.

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I want to set the process group from same shell script (self). –  Jacob Jul 1 '11 at 15:00

2 Answers 2

I don't think Bourne, bash, or zsh will let you do that, but you could do it in perl using the built-in setpgrp (note the slight name difference from POSIX). Pass zero as the PID to modify the group of the perl process itself:

setpgrp(0, 12345) || die "$!"

You might think you could use perl from, say, bash to set the bash process's group (by passing $$ to a perl script, for example), but I don't think the perl process would be able to modify the group of a process that it didn't fork.

Depending on what you're trying to do, the job control features in various shells may give you what you need, in a different way, like if you just want to detach from the terminal.

UPDATE: I think it's strange that this answer has received a couple of down-votes without clear explanation why. My guess is that the downvoters are misunderstanding the question, which is asking how to change the process group of the current shell. Or perhaps they know how to do a setpgrp from the shell but are keeping the secret to themselves.

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Just checked, an interactive shell runs programs in a new process group. Non-interactive one (like one started by cron) runs programs in the same process group (since there is no controlling terminal there is no need to multiplex it between processes). And process group can't be changed using shell built-ins. –  Maxim Egorushkin Feb 13 '12 at 22:46
    
My answer is about changing the process group of the current process. Please be specific about what I said that's incorrect so I can reevaluate it. –  Rob Davis Feb 13 '12 at 23:11
    
I'm guessing they don't like the perl dependency, but thats not fair to your answer. IMO and downvote should REQUIRE a comment –  nhed Feb 10 at 1:13

Linux has a setsid utility, which runs the command passed as argument in its own session (using the eponymous system call). This is stronger than running it in its own process group à la setpgrp, but that may be ok for your purpose.

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