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for example from bash:

kill -9 -PID 

os.kill(pid, signal.SIGKILL) kill only parent process.

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Useless use of kill -9! See partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html#uuk9letter –  Gareth Rees Jul 1 '11 at 16:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

When you pass a negative PID to kill, it actually sends the signal to the process group by that (absolute) number. You do the equivalent with os.killpg() in Python.

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If the parent process is not a "process group" but you want to kill it with the children, you can use psutil (https://pythonhosted.org/psutil/#processes). os.killpg cannot identify pid of a non-process-group.

import psutil

parent_pid = 30437   # my example
parent = psutil.Process(parent_pid)
for child in parent.children(recursive=True):  # or parent.children() for recursive=False
    child.kill()
parent.kill()
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you should use signal parameter 9 to kill the process tree.
root@localhost:~$ python
>>> import os
>>> os.kill(pid, 9)

if you should use signal.SIGKILL constant, you should use os.killpg(pgid, signal.SIGKILL) to kill the process tree.

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No. signal.SIGKILL is the right constant to use. –  Thomas Wouters Jul 1 '11 at 22:30
    
os.kill(pid,9) is worked for me, i use python 2.7 on centos 5.6 –  Alan Shi Jul 2 '11 at 14:27
1  
Yes, os.kill(pid, 9) works when signal.SIGKILL happens to be 9, which is on most platforms. Nevertheless, signal.SIGKILL is the right constant to use, and using 9 instead of signal.SIGKILL is not an improvement nor does it in any way solve the OP's problem. –  Thomas Wouters Jul 2 '11 at 23:46
    
you are right, if you have to use signal.SIGKILL constant, you should use os.killpg(pgid, signal.SIGKILL) to kill a group process. –  Alan Shi Jul 3 '11 at 5:55

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