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This was an interview question. Consider the following:

struct A {}; 
struct B : A {}; 
A a; 
B b; 
a = b;
b = a; 

Why does b = a; throw an error, while a = b; is perfectly fine?

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1  
What's the error? –  MGZero Jul 1 '11 at 15:13
3  
That’s actually a very good question. There’s no immediately obvious reason why the first statement works. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 1 '11 at 15:14
    
I'm assuming a struct behaves just like a class - it just chops off all the unique 'B' struct items and copies all the 'a's. –  DanTheMan Jul 1 '11 at 15:16
3  
@user: a struct is a class. It's just that stuff is public by the default. Other than that they're the same. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 1 '11 at 15:20
2  
@JohnMcG: structs are classes in C++. There's no "essence" being obfuscated here. –  Billy ONeal Jul 1 '11 at 18:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Because the implicitly declared copy assignment operator of B hides the implicitly declared copy assignment operator of A.

So for the line b = a, only the the operator= of B is a candidate. But its parameter has type B const&, which cannot be initialized by an A argument (you would need a downcast). So you get an error.

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3  
This is the correct answer. –  Puppy Jul 1 '11 at 15:25
14  
You can try changing the definition of B to struct B : A { using A::operator=; }; and observe that both lines will compile. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 1 '11 at 15:29
    
Good answer that makes total sense. The other answers are more philosophical, while this one contains the specific technical reason that it doesn't work. –  Martin Vilcans Jul 1 '11 at 15:52
    
@Johannes - line 1 is an example of object-slicing. So, a has only it's own sub-object. Now, in line 2 to do b = a ; , shouldn't a must possess both the sub-objects of type a,b ? Though this compiles, isn't the concept flawed ? Thanks. –  Mahesh Jul 1 '11 at 16:22
1  
@logic_max: struct A {}; struct B { A& operator= (const &A) {return *this} // it was hidden }; A a; B b; a = b; b = a; // no compilation error here –  badawi Jul 1 '11 at 20:05

Because every B is an A, but not every A is a B.

Edited following comments to make things a bit clearer (I modified your example):

struct A {int someInt;}; 
struct B : A {int anotherInt}; 
A a; 
B b; 

/* Compiler thinks: B inherits from A, so I'm going to create
   a new A from b, stripping B-specific fields. Then, I assign it to a.
   Let's do this!
 */
a = b;

/* Compiler thinks: I'm missing some information here! If I create a new B
   from a, what do I put in b.anotherInt?
   Let's not do this!
 */
b = a;

In your example, there's no attributes someInt nor anotherInt, so it could work. But the compiler will not allow it anyway.

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7  
-1: Philosophically, your answer is correct, but the philosophy only translates straightforwardly into code when you're talking using pointers to refer to the objects. There are some technical details about the implicit A::operator= and B::operator= missing that other answers cover better. –  Ken Bloom Jul 1 '11 at 18:36
1  
+1 to counter silly downvotes, no matter that they're explained –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 11 '12 at 21:00
    
@LokiAstari: you're wrong. the answer is correct, just not very C++ technical. other languages do the same in slightly different ways. it is better to understand the "why" and not the technical C++ level details, than having memorized the details and not understand the "why". litb's answer is a bit lacking in the "why" department. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 11 '12 at 21:05
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Now it is good. Without the comments it was meaningless. See history. –  Loki Astari Jul 11 '12 at 21:17

It's true that a B is an A, but an A is not a B, but this fact is only directly applicable when you're working with pointers or references to A's and B's. The problem here is your assignment operator.

struct A {}; 
struct B : A {};

Is equivalent to

struct A {
   A& operator=(const A&);
}; 
struct B : A {
   B& operator=(const B&);
};

So when you're assigning below:

A a; 
B b; 
a = b;

The assignment operator on a can be called with an argument of b, because a B is an A, so b can be passed to the assignment operator as an A&. Note that a's assignment operator only knows about the data that's in an A, and not the stuff in a B, so any members of B that aren't part of A get lost - this is known as 'slicing'.

But when you're trying to assign:

b = a; 

a is of type A, which is not a B, so a can't match the B& parameter to b's assignment operator.

You would think that b=a should just call the inherited A& A::operator=(const A&), but this is not the case. The assignment operator B& B::operator=(const B&) hides the operator that would be inherited from A. It can be restored again with a using A::operator=; declaration.

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I've changed the names of your structs to make the reason obvious:

struct Animal {}; 
struct Bear : Animal {}; 
Animal a; 
Bear b; 
a = b; // line 1 
b = a; // line 2 

Clearly, any Bear is also an Animal, but not every Animal can be considered a Bear.

Because every B "isa" A, any instance of B must also be an instance of A: by definition it has the same members in the same order as any other instance of A. Copying b into a loses the B-specific members, but completely fills the members of a resulting in a struct that satisfies the requirements of A. Copying a to b, on the other hand, may leave b incomplete because B could have more members than A. That's hard to see here because neither A nor B has any members at all, but this is why the compiler allows one assignment and not the other.

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2  
This is wrong for the same reason as Cicada’s answer; see comments there for an explanation. Oh, and it’s also wrong for other reasons (LSP). –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 1 '11 at 15:16
2  
Changing the names doesn't make it any more obvious to me. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 1 '11 at 15:26
    
The Rectangle/Square inheritance is a classic example of where inheritance as "is-a" is counter-intuitive to some as you could argue that Rectangle should be a subclass of Square instead. Can you give a better example? –  Martin Vilcans Jul 1 '11 at 15:49
    
@Martin, you make a great point. How about Bear instead of Square? ;-) –  Caleb Jul 1 '11 at 16:19
    
Well... given Animal::setCovering(Covering c); you can do Bear b; b.setCovering(Feathers);. So you could also argue that an Animal is a Bear, or that none is a sublcass of the other. What matters is not who inherits from whom, but what gets inherited. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 1 '11 at 16:32

Remember that if there's not an explicitly declared copy-assignment operators one will be implicitly declared and defined for any class (and structs are classes in C++).

For struct A it'll have the following signature:

A& A::operator=(const A&)

And it simply performs memberwise assignment of its subobjects.

a = b; is OK because B will match with the const A& parameter for A::operator=(const A&). Since only members of A are 'memberwise assigned' to the target, any members of B that aren't part of A get lost - this is known as 'slicing'.

For struct B the implcit assignment operator will have the following signature:

B& B::operator=(const B&)

b = a; is not OK because A won't match the const B& argument.

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If I am getting interviewed then, I will explain in little philosophical way.

a = b;

is valid, because every B contains A as its part. So a can extract A from within B. However, A doesn't contain B. thus b cannot find B from within A; that's why,

b = a;

is invalid.

[Analogically, a void* can be found in any Type*, but Type* cannot be found in void* (thus we need a cast).]

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This is also wrong. The first conversion is lossy (that is, it incurs a loss of information). So why is it valid? It shouldn’t be. Your analogy is flawed because the conversion to void* isn’t lossy. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 1 '11 at 15:28
4  
@Konrad, I disagree. Information is lost, but the B-specific parts of the b object are not needed for the object to be a valid A, so the B-specific members can be sliced away. This is a debated part of the C++ standard because it cause problems with non-virtual functions. For plain data objects, there shouldn't be a problem. –  Martin Vilcans Jul 1 '11 at 15:33
1  
@Martin Even plain data objects will suffer from this loss; consider the (allowed) implicit conversion from double to int. The fact that C++ allows this is inane. Most modern languages forbid this because it’s dangerous. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 1 '11 at 15:36
    
@Konrad, when we do a = b;, the loss is expected. That's why it's slicing. The analogy is just to support the natural conversion. –  iammilind Jul 1 '11 at 15:41
2  
@Konrad, read the question again. It was specifically about subclassing of structs. Neither of int and double is a subclass of the other. –  Martin Vilcans Jul 1 '11 at 16:18

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