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If I bind to a DirectoryEntry ( without any arguments) on the application mode to search all the users at my current domain, I could see the logged in in user is the default credential for DirectoryEntry since it finds all the users for my domain. With that, I would expect that this won't work if the application is run at service mode since account for service is SYSTEM which is not a user of my domain. However the code still works and it could get all the users of my logged in user domain.

I did some search on internet, I didn't find any answer on this when running as a service. Any idea? Any way I could get that default credential at power shell?

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used this code at powershell to get current user: $curUser = [Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity]::GetCurrent().Name, I got "NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM" back. Either the SYSTEM account works for querying AD or DirectoryEntry internally impersonates as logged in user. –  windfly2006 Jul 1 '11 at 15:53
    
After some experiments. I found that that the domain which the computer is joined is used for the DirectoryEntry bind for service. It doesn't matter if user is logged in or not. It doesn't matter what user (could be users from other domain in the same forest) is logged in. However we could specify the service account for the service to force service to run as some other credential instead of the default credential. –  windfly2006 Jul 2 '11 at 0:31
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At service mode, the default credential for directory entry would be the credential which computer is used to login into the domain (called computer login). See this link: http://serverfault.com/questions/61191/what-happens-when-a-computer-joins-an-active-directory-domain.

I first tried to use System.Net.CredentialCache::DefaultNetworkCredentials to try to get the default credential, however I found out the user and domain are all blank. It is confirmed from MSDN that we could not view those info with the returned NetworkCredentials.

So I added the following vb script (got the base code from this link: http://blogs.technet.com/b/heyscriptingguy/archive/2008/05/12/how-can-i-determine-the-distinguished-name-of-the-ou-where-the-logged-on-user-s-user-account-resides.aspx) to be called from power shell to get the dn of the current user and save it to a file.

Set objSysInfo = CreateObject("ADSystemInfo")
strUserName = objSysInfo.UserName
Set objUser = GetObject("LDAP://" & strUserName)
Wscript.Echo objUser.distinguishedName
Set objFS = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
strTemp = "c:\temp\dn.txt"
Set objOutFile = objFS.CreateTextFile(strTemp,True)    
objOutFile.Write(objUser.distinguishedName)
objOutFile.Close

Then when I ran it in service context, I found out that user is my computer itself, like this:

CN=my computer name,OU=Domain computer accounts,DC=domain,DC=local
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