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Ideally I want to do this:

UPDATE TOP (10) messages SET status=10 WHERE status=0 ORDER BY priority DESC;

In English: I want to get the top 10 available (status=0) messages from the DB and lock them (status=10). A message with a higher priority should be gotten first.

unfortunately MS SQL doesn't allow an order by clause in the update.

Anyway how to circumvent this?

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4 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can do a subquery where you first get the IDs of the top 10 order by priority and the update the once that are on that sub query

UPDATE  messages SET status=10 WHERE ID in (SELECT TOP (10) Id FROM Table WHERE status=0 ORDER BY priority DESC);
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given that I would like an index for this solution. Would I then use: (priority desc, status) or (status, priority desc)? In other words: is the order by used before the where? –  Toad Mar 17 '09 at 18:39
4  
Actually the query was not correct.... the order by clause can not be used in a subquery UNLESS a TOP is also given. (This is what the SQL engine says). So the correct query should be: UPDATE messages SET status=10 WHERE ID in (SELECT TOP (10) Id FROM Table WHERE status=0 ORDER BY priority DESC); –  Toad Mar 17 '09 at 18:57
    
You are right, I missed the top when I wrote the final edit. I will edit it as you said –  Eduardo Crimi Mar 17 '09 at 19:15
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WITH    q AS
        (
        SELECT  TOP 10 *
        FROM    messages
        WHERE   status = 0
        ORDER BY
                priority DESC
        )
UPDATE  q
SET     status = 10
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2  
+1 for the CTE, doing it this way gets rid of a join for me when using an OUTPUT clause –  Matt Davis Nov 19 '10 at 1:51
3  
This would actually be the preferred answer instead of the accepted one. –  Carvelis Feb 25 '11 at 11:57
    
Keep in mind that the two statements are not atomic. –  Haroon May 10 '12 at 19:05
1  
@Haroon: which two statements? –  Quassnoi May 10 '12 at 19:08
2  
@xkingpin: CTE is atomic. –  Quassnoi May 13 '13 at 13:02
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You can use also the SET ROWCOUNT clase

SET ROWCOUNT 10

UPDATE messages
SET status = 10 
WHERE status=0 

SET ROWCOUNT 0

Or with a temp table

DECLARE @t TABLE (id INT)
INSERT @t (id)
SELECT TOP 10 id
FROM messages
WHERE status = 0
ORDER BY priority DESC

UPDATE messages
SET status = 10
WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM @t)
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1  
For those reading this far back.. (you never know.) SET ROWCOUNT is facing deprecation msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188774.aspx "Using SET ROWCOUNT will not affect DELETE, INSERT, and UPDATE statements in a future release of SQL Server." - it's good up to SQL Server 2014 though at least. –  Tabloo Quijico Jun 11 at 11:26
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UPDATE messages SET 
 status=10 
WHERE ID in (SELECT TOP (10) Id FROM Table WHERE status=0 ORDER BY priority DESC);
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