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This is a brute force attempt to solve the problem, but it is not giving the right answer. The program runs, but its not producing desired output. I believe the logic and program is correct.

This is problem of a famous site (don't want to a spoiler)

It asks for the number that produces the longest Collatz chain under one million.

class Euler
{

public static void main (String args[])
{
    long len,longLength=0;
    for(long i =3;i<=1000000;i++)
    {
        len = Euler14.numFucs(i);
        System.out.println("Ans"+len+"\t"+i);
        if(len>longLength)
            longLength=len;
    }
    System.out.println(longLength);
}


public static long numFucs(long num)
{
    long count=1,$test=0;
    while(num>1)
    {
        if(num%2==0)
        {
            num=num/2;

        }
        else
        {
            num=3*num+1;

        }
        count++;


    }
    //System.out.println("\tEnd");
    return count;
    }
}
share|improve this question
6  
"Something is wrong" - could you be a little more precise? See tinyurl.com/so-hints –  Jon Skeet Jul 1 '11 at 15:44
    
Could you post any kind of information about this project Euler? I have no idea what the problem could be since I don't know what you are looking for. –  Mike Jul 1 '11 at 15:47
    
@Jon Skeet loop is not giving desire answer... loop is working.. sorry ll improve in future conversations thanks –  CoolEulerProject Jul 1 '11 at 15:50
1  
I think what Jon was asking was "what result were you expecting from the loop, and how does it's actual output differ from that expectation?". "They're different" doesn't really help. –  RHSeeger Jul 1 '11 at 15:56
1  
Incidentally, "brutal force" is not a normal programming term - we say "brute force". However, "brutal force" does sound pretty rad, and i will start saying it now. –  Tom Anderson Jul 1 '11 at 18:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, I feel like it'd be cheating to give you the code for the right answer, as a fellow Project Euler fan. You're outputting the length of the longest chain, not the number that obtains it. If you really want, I can show you the one line that needs to change, but, honestly, this is a simple fix, and I challenge you to do it yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Got it... thanks... –  CoolEulerProject Jul 1 '11 at 19:48
    
No problem! Good luck with future problems! –  Poik Jul 1 '11 at 19:57

If the program is suppose to compute the number of steps in the Collatz Conjecture the implementation looks fine to me.

The sequence of numbers in described by OEIS Sequence A008908.

Here's is your program together with some debug output.

class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        long len, longLength = 0;
        System.out.println(Test.numFucs(13));
        String[] correct = ("1, 1, 2, 8, 3, 6, 9, 17, 4, 20, 7, 15, 10, 10, 18,"
                         + " 18, 5, 13, 21, 21, 8, 8, 16, 16, 11, 24, 11, 112, "
                         + "19, 19, 19, 107, 6, 27, 14, 14, 22, 22, 22, 35, 9, "
                         + "110, 9, 30, 17, 17, 17, 105, 12, 25, 25, 25, 12, "
                         + "12, 113, 113, 20, 33, 20, 33, 20, 20, 108, 108, 7,"
                         + " 28, 28, 28, 15, 15, 15, 103").split(", ");

        for (int i = 0; i <= 70; i++) {
            len = Test.numFucs(i);
            System.out.printf("i = %2d, Correct %3s, Computed: %3d%n", i,
                    correct[i], len);
            if (len > longLength)
                longLength = len;
        }

        System.out.println(longLength);
    }

    public static long numFucs(long num) {
        long count = 1;
        while (num > 1) {
            if (num % 2 == 0) {
                num = num / 2;

            } else {
                num = 3 * num + 1;

            }
            count++;
        }

        // System.out.println(count);
        return count;
    }
}

Output:

i =  0, Correct   1, Computed:   1
i =  1, Correct   1, Computed:   1
i =  2, Correct   2, Computed:   2
i =  3, Correct   8, Computed:   8
i =  4, Correct   3, Computed:   3
i =  5, Correct   6, Computed:   6
i =  6, Correct   9, Computed:   9
i =  7, Correct  17, Computed:  17
i =  8, Correct   4, Computed:   4
i =  9, Correct  20, Computed:  20
i = 10, Correct   7, Computed:   7
i = 11, Correct  15, Computed:  15
i = 12, Correct  10, Computed:  10
i = 13, Correct  10, Computed:  10
i = 14, Correct  18, Computed:  18
i = 15, Correct  18, Computed:  18
i = 16, Correct   5, Computed:   5
...

As you can see it follows the OEIS sequence.

The error must be some where else.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, but answer is wrong; I find no reason it must give wrong answer... –  CoolEulerProject Jul 1 '11 at 15:53
    
Why? What's the correct answer? The given the sample input in the exercise (13) it correctly produces 10. –  aioobe Jul 1 '11 at 15:56
    
@ aioobe yes it give right answer for sample, I don't know the answer, just its wrong for sure... –  CoolEulerProject Jul 1 '11 at 15:59
    
So for which case does it give wrong answer? –  aioobe Jul 1 '11 at 15:59
1  
The loop is correct. Answer updated. –  aioobe Jul 1 '11 at 16:07

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