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While reading the Android developers blog post on location, I came across this bit of code (cut & paste from the blog):

List<String> matchingProviders = locationManager.getAllProviders();
for (String provider: matchingProviders) {
  Location location = locationManager.getLastKnownLocation(provider);
  if (location != null) {
    float accuracy = location.getAccuracy();
    long time = location.getTime();

    if ((time > minTime && accuracy < bestAccuracy)) {
      bestResult = location;
      bestAccuracy = accuracy;
      bestTime = time;
    }
    else if (time < minTime && 
         bestAccuracy == Float.MAX_VALUE && time > bestTime){
      bestResult = location;
      bestTime = time;
    }
  }
}

While the rest is pretty clear, this line has me stumped:

    else if (time < minTime && 
         bestAccuracy == Float.MAX_VALUE && time > bestTime){

'time' has to be within the acceptable latency period & more recent than the previous bestTime. That makes sense.

But what does the comparison of bestAccuracy to Max Float value mean? When would the accuracy be exactly equal to the maximum value a float can hold?

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Looks like the developer expects any user captured data for bestAccuracy will be less than Float.MAX_VALUE. Why he is not using a negative number instead is odd. –  Perception Jul 1 '11 at 16:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That particular bit makes more sense if you follow his link to the whole source file. Here's a slightly bigger snippet:

Location bestResult = null;
float bestAccuracy = Float.MAX_VALUE;
long bestTime = Long.MIN_VALUE;

// Iterate through all the providers on the system, keeping
// note of the most accurate result within the acceptable time limit.
// If no result is found within maxTime, return the newest Location.
List<String> matchingProviders = locationManager.getAllProviders();
for (String provider: matchingProviders) {
  Location location = locationManager.getLastKnownLocation(provider);
  if (location != null) {
    float accuracy = location.getAccuracy();
    long time = location.getTime();

    if ((time > minTime && accuracy < bestAccuracy)) {
      bestResult = location;
      bestAccuracy = accuracy;
      bestTime = time;
    }
    else if (time < minTime && bestAccuracy == Float.MAX_VALUE && time > bestTime) {
      bestResult = location;
      bestTime = time;
    }
  }
}

Very simply, Float.MAX_VALUE is his default value for bestAccuracy and he's just checking that he hasn't reduced it in the previous if clause.

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Yes, it makes perfect sense with the previous few lines. Thanks! –  OceanBlue Jul 1 '11 at 18:48

I'm guessing that bestAccuracy has been initialized to Float.MAX_VALUE. If so it looks like the code can be summarized as: find the provider with the smallest (best?) accuracy with time greater than minTime. If there is no time greater than minTime, then just take the one with the time closest to minTime.

This could be refactored from

    if ((time < minTime && accuracy < bestAccuracy)) {
      bestResult = location;
      bestAccuracy = accuracy;
      bestTime = time;
    }
    else if (time > minTime && bestAccuracy == Float.MAX_VALUE && time < bestTime) {
      bestResult = location;
      bestTime = time;
    }

to

    if ((time < minTime && accuracy < bestAccuracy)) {
      bestResult = location;
      bestAccuracy = accuracy;
      bestTime = time;
      foundWithinTimeLimit = true;
    }
    else if (time > minTime && !foundWithinTimeLimit && time < bestTime) {
      bestResult = location;
      bestTime = time;
    }

makes it a little bit clearer.

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+1 for providing the refactored code which is much more readable. –  OceanBlue Jul 1 '11 at 18:49

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