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I currently have the following code:

public enum FieldType
{
    Int,
    Year,
    String,
    DateTime
}
public enum DataType
{
    Int,
    String,
    DateTime
}

I would like to have an extension method for each so that I can do something like this:

FieldType fType = FieldType.Year;
DataType dType = DataType.Int;

fType.Equals(dType); //If fType is an Int/Year, and dType is an Int it should return true
dType.Equals(fType); //If dType is an Int, and fType is an Int/Year it should be true

Is there a way to create a .Equals extension, so that this will work out?

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1  
I'm confused. You're saying you want FieltType.Year to be "equal to" DataType.Int? What does that even mean? –  StriplingWarrior Jul 1 '11 at 16:23
    
@StriplingWarrior The purpose behind this is that Year is an int when it comes to data value and should be treated as such, but our formatted value may allow different default options for the user to select. For instance, if we were dealing with a normal int, we may offer "Currency" as a format option, but it doesn't make sense for a year. Likewise, for year, we may offer a "Short Year" (2-digit) option, but that doesn't make sense for an int, even though when it comes to dealing with the data value, both are legitimate options. –  Spazmoose Sep 6 '11 at 17:06
    
So FieldType.Int == DataType.Int and FieldType.Year == DataType.Int, but FieldType.Int != FieldType.Year? That breaks the Transitive Property of Equality (mathwords.com/t/transitive_property.htm), so you should be using a method name that doesn't imply equality. –  StriplingWarrior Sep 6 '11 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As Jon said, reusing a framework's method name is not a very good idea.

But you could easily do something like that :

public static class Extensions
{
    public static bool IsEquivalentTo(this FieldType field, DataType data)
    {
        return data.ToString() == field.ToString();
    }

    public static bool IsEquivalentTo(this DataType data, FieldType field)
    {
        return data.ToString() == field.ToString();
    }
}

or even better :

public static class Extensions
{
    public static bool IsEquivalentTo(this Enum e1, Enum e2)
    {
        return e1.ToString() == e2.ToString();
    }
}
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1  
The generic method will not compile because System.Enum cannot be a constraint. (It is not supported by the CLR.) You could drop the constraint and use System.Type.IsEnum however to do a runtime check. –  mike z Jul 1 '11 at 18:22
    
@mike You're right, shame on me. The IDE didn't warn until compilation and I took the solution as right a bit too fast, sorry. I corrected my answer which now perfectly works. –  Ssithra Jul 3 '11 at 7:46
    
I don't think that works with the desired behaviour of "If fType is an Int/Year, and dType is an Int it should return true" - because FieldType.Year and DataType.Int won't compare as true using your implementation. –  Jon Skeet Jul 3 '11 at 7:53
    
I totally missed that, you're right Jon. I would better have to cancel my answer (I don't know if I can). –  Ssithra Jul 4 '11 at 7:56

Well you could write:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static bool Equals(this FieldType field, DataType data)
    {
        return data.Equals(field);
    }

    public static bool Equals(this DataType data, FieldType field)
    {
        // Insert logic here
    }
}

I'm not sure I would though... because you're overloading object.Equals in an inconsistent manner. So if someone wrote:

object field = FieldType.Int;
Console.WriteLine(field.Equals(DataType.Int));

that would print False, because it would be using object.Equals instead of the extension method.

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Jon is right. That would be very confusing. Rather then overriding Equals, it would be better to just make methods such as IsInteger(dType) or IsString(dType). That would make more sense since your not really testing for equality, per se –  Icemanind Jul 1 '11 at 16:26
    
Yes, this. Just don't use the method name Equals because it already has another meaning. –  CodingWithSpike Jul 1 '11 at 16:32
    
I'm not so hung up on using .Equals, so something like what Ssithra posted for a name (IsEquivalentTo) would work just as well. Thanks for the help. –  Spazmoose Jul 1 '11 at 17:22
    
@Spazmoose Mike Z accurately mentioned that my first answer didn't work 'as is' and I corrected it. It should now satisfy your needs. –  Ssithra Jul 3 '11 at 7:48
    
Updated to have Ssithra's answer as the correct answer, because using .Equals would be a less desirable option. As well as the answer being just a tad bit closer to what I was looking for. –  Spazmoose Sep 6 '11 at 17:10

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