Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the code below I want to syncronize the reporting of the results of a list of tasks. This is working now because task.Result blocks until the task completes. However, task id = 3 takes a long time to complete and blocks all of the other finished tasks from reporting their status.

I think that I can do this by moving the reporting (Console.Write) into a .ContinueWith instruction but I don't have a UI thread so how do I get a TaskScheduler to syncronize the .ContinueWith tasks?

What I have now:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Starting on {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

    var tasks = new List<Task<int>>();

    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        var num = i;
        var t = Task<int>.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
           if (num == 3)
           {
               Thread.Sleep(20000);
           }
           Thread.Sleep(new Random(num).Next(1000, 5000));
           Console.WriteLine("Done {0} on {1}", num, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
           return num;
        });
        tasks.Add(t);
    }

    foreach (var task in tasks)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Completed {0} on {1}", task.Result, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    }

    Console.WriteLine("End of Main");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

I would like to move to this or something similar but I need the Console.Write("Completed...") to all happen on the same thread:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Starting on {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        var num = i;
        Task<int>.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
           if (num == 3)
           {
               Thread.Sleep(20000);
           }
           Thread.Sleep(new Random(num).Next(1000, 10000));
           Console.WriteLine("Done {0} on {1}", num, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
           return num;
       }).ContinueWith(value =>
       {
           Console.WriteLine("Completed {0} on {1}", value.Result, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
       } 

     /* need syncronization context */);
    }

    Console.WriteLine("End of Main");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

-- SOLUTION -- After getting some comments and reading some of the solutions this is the complete solution that does what I want. The goal here is to process severl long running tasks as fast as possible and then do something with the results of each task one at a time.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Starting on {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

    var results = new BlockingCollection<int>();

    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        while (!results.IsCompleted)
        {
            try
            {
                var x = results.Take();
                Console.WriteLine("Completed {0} on {1}", x, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            }
            catch (InvalidOperationException)
            {
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("\r\nNo more items to take.");
    });

    var tasks = new List<Task>();

    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        var num = i;
        var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            if (num == 3)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(20000);
            }
            Thread.Sleep(new Random(num).Next(1000, 10000));
            Console.WriteLine("Done {0} on {1}", num, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            results.Add(num);
        });

        tasks.Add(t);
    }

    Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll(tasks.ToArray(), _ => results.CompleteAdding());

    Console.WriteLine("End of Main");
    Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this question
    
I assume the Console thread is a stand-in for a GUI (WinForms/WPF). Which is not a good idea, the presence of a Dispatcher/Messageloop makes a (big) difference. –  Henk Holterman Jul 1 '11 at 17:58
1  
Otherwise, think about what you mean with "happening on the same thread". Can't do that unless that thread is polling. –  Henk Holterman Jul 1 '11 at 18:00
    
I need to change it so that only one of the ContinueWith tasks runs at a time. It doesn't matter if they run on the same thread or not but I can't have two of them running in parallel. In real life I the ContinueWith part is writing a lot of data into a database. –  Ryan Pedersen Jul 1 '11 at 18:40
    
So you actually have a n-Producer/1-Consumer pattern. –  Henk Holterman Jul 1 '11 at 18:47
    
And this has nothing to do with writing to the console on a specific thread...My revised answer is appropriate and could be extended to "writing a lot of data into a database". –  user7116 Jul 1 '11 at 20:46
show 1 more comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You'll have to create a writer task of some sort, however, keep in mind even this task can be rescheduled onto another native or managed thread! Using the default scheduler in TPL you have no control over which managed thread receives the work.

public class ConcurrentConsole
{
    private static BlockingCollection<string> output
        = new BlockingCollection<string>();

    public static Task CreateWriterTask(CancellationToken token)
    {
        return new Task(
            () =>
            {
                while (!token.IsCancellationRequested)
                {
                    string nextLine = output.Take(token);
                    Console.WriteLine(nextLine);
                }
            },
            token);
    }

    public static void WriteLine(Func<string> writeLine)
    {
        output.Add(writeLine());
    }
}

When I switched your code to use this I received the following output:

End of Main
Done 1 on 6
Completed 1 on 6
Done 5 on 9
Completed 5 on 9
Done 0 on 4
Completed 0 on 4
Done 2 on 5
Completed 2 on 13
Done 7 on 10
Completed 7 on 10
Done 4 on 8
Completed 4 on 5
Done 9 on 12
Completed 9 on 9
Done 6 on 6
Completed 6 on 5
Done 8 on 11
Completed 8 on 4
Done 3 on 7
Completed 3 on 7

Even with your code sending () => String.Format("Completed {0} on {1}"... to ConcurrentConsole.WriteLine, ensuring the ManagedThreadId would be picked up on the ConcurrentConsole Task, it still would alter which thread it ran on. Although with less variability than the executing tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually worse than my foreach task loop. This waits for all the tasks to complete before reporting the results of any of them. What I am looking for is a way to report the completion of the task as soon as it is done and have that reporting syncronized to one thread. I don't want one long running task to block the others from reporting. –  Ryan Pedersen Jul 1 '11 at 17:11
    
@Ryan: I've added the reporting to a specific Task, which is the best you can guarantee in TPL. –  user7116 Jul 1 '11 at 17:48
    
This isn't exactly how I implemented the system but the idea of using a BlockingCollection is at the core of the implementation. –  Ryan Pedersen Jul 2 '11 at 22:46
add comment

I would suggest:

1) Creating a lock object
2) Create a list of strings to be written
3) Spawn a thread that loops, sleeping for a bit, then locking the list of strings, then if it isn't empty, writing all of them and emptying the list
4) Other threads then lock the list, add their status, unlock and continue.

object writeListLocker = new object();
List<string> linesToWrite = new List<string>();

// Main thread loop
for (; ; )
{
    lock (writerListLocker)
    {
        foreach (string nextLine in linesToWrite)
            Console.WriteLine(nextLine);
        linesToWrite.Clear();
    }
    Thread.Sleep(500);
}

// Reporting threads
lock (writerListLocker)
{
    linesToWrite.Add("Completed (etc.)");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would like to continue to use the TPL if I can. It doesn't look like the above is going to allow the processing to happen on a series of threads while the writing of the results is syncronized on one thread. –  Ryan Pedersen Jul 1 '11 at 16:53
    
But that's exactly what this does. The main thread loop does all the writing. The other threads all add to the linesToWrite object instead of writing. –  Ed Bayiates Jul 1 '11 at 17:38
add comment

You can use OrderedTaskScheduler to ensure only one task completion is run at a time; however, they will run on a threadpool thread (not necessarily all on the same thread).

If you really need them all on the same thread (not just one at a time), then you can use ActionThread from the Nito.Async library. It provides a SynchronizationContext for its code, which can be picked up by FromCurrentSynchronizationContext.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the direction that I want to go. I wanted to bring the ContinueWith operations onto a single thread in order to ensure that only one of them runs at a time. Not sure if I can use the OrderedTaskScheduler in production though. I would like to use the FromCurrentSynchronizationContext but I can't because I am in a service environment (a.k.a. no UI thread) and SyncronizationContext.Current is returning null. –  Ryan Pedersen Jul 1 '11 at 18:38
    
I consider both OrderedTaskScheduler and ActionThread to be production quality. It sounds like either of them could solve your problem. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 1 '11 at 18:42
add comment

I think you expect a result like the following.

Starting on 8
Done 1 on 11
Completed 1 on 9
Done 5 on 11
Completed 5 on 9
Done 0 on 10
Completed 0 on 9
Done 2 on 12
Completed 2 on 9
Done 7 on 16
Completed 7 on 9
Done 4 on 14
Completed 4 on 9
Done 9 on 18
Completed 9 on 9
Done 6 on 15
Completed 6 on 9
Done 8 on 17
Completed 8 on 9
Done 3 on 13
Completed 3 on 9

As below, I used the StaSynchronizationContext in my code from the Understanding SynchronizationContext where a synchronized call in one thread is explained well. Please, refer to it.

My code snippet is:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    StaSynchronizationContext context = new StaSynchronizationContext();
    StaSynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(context);
    Console.WriteLine("Starting on {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        var num = i;
        Task<int>.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            if (num == 3)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(20000);
            }
            Thread.Sleep(new Random(num).Next(1000, 10000));
            Console.WriteLine("Done {0} on {1}", num, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            return num;
        }).ContinueWith(
        value =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Completed {0} on {1}", value.Result, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
        }
       ,TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
    }
    Console.WriteLine("End of Main");
    Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.