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In my mailer controller, under certain conditions (missing data) we abort sending the email.

How do I exit the controller method without still rendering a view in that case?

return if @some_email_data.nil?

Doesn't do the trick since the view is still rendered (throwing an error every place I try to use @some_email_data unless I add a lot of nil checks)

And even if I do the nil checks, it complains there's no 'sender' (because I supposed did a 'return' before getting to the line where I set the sender and subject.

Neither does render ... return

Basically, RETURN DOESN'T RETURN inside a mailer method!

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Can you paste some relative code? –  JCorcuera Jul 1 '11 at 20:39
    
Does return from a mailer work in Rails 2? –  schwabsauce Jul 1 at 16:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I just encountered same thing here.

My solution was following:

module BulletproofMailer
  class BlackholeMailMessage < Mail::Message
    def self.deliver
      false
    end
  end

  class AbortDeliveryError < StandardError
  end

  class Base < ActionMailer::Base

    def abort_delivery
      raise AbortDeliveryError
    end

    def process(*args)
      begin
        super *args
      rescue AbortDeliveryError
        self.message = BulletproofMailer::BlackholeMailMessage
      end
    end
  end
end

Using these wrapper mailer would look like this:

class EventMailer < BulletproofMailer::Base
  include Resque::Mailer
  def event_created(event_id)
    begin
      @event = CalendarEvent.find(event_id)
    rescue ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound
      abort_delivery
    end
  end
end

It is also posted in my blog.

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Nice. Really elegant, thanks! –  jpwynn Jul 6 '11 at 20:47
    
I still believe this could be done way easier, but I don't know how. –  Eisenhorn Jul 8 '11 at 9:05
    
@Eisenhorn There is - have a look at my answer. –  Bozhidar Batsov Nov 7 '12 at 19:26
    
I have an ApplicationMailer base class for all of my emails (much like ApplicationController) and I put this functionality in there. –  Mike Dotterer Jun 13 '13 at 15:13

A much simpler solution than the accepted answer would be something like:

class SomeMailer < ActionMailer::Base
  def some_method
    if @some_email_data.nil?
      self.message.perform_deliveries = false
    else
      mail(...)  
    end  
  end
end

If you're using Rails 3.2.9 (or later things even better) - there you can finally conditionally call mail(). Here's the related GitHub thread. Now the code can be reworked like this:

class SomeMailer < ActionMailer::Base
  def some_method
    unless @some_email_data.nil?
      mail(...)  
    end  
  end
end
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And how do you test this out come? –  Anlek Nov 13 '12 at 6:09
1  
Seems like in Rails 3.2.9 you might be able to see mail.should be_a_kind_of NullMail but I still don't know how to test it in Rails 3.2.8 –  Anlek Nov 13 '12 at 6:14
    
Added with a little playing around, I figured out you can do this in Rails 3.2.8: mail.perform_deliveries.should_not be –  Anlek Nov 13 '12 at 6:22

I haven't spent much time with rails 3 but you could try using

redirect_to some_other_route

alternatively, if you're really just checking for missing data you could do a js validation of the form fields and only submit if it passes.

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there's no user or session to redirect to... (the method is called by delayed job in response to some event triggers) we need the method to simply stop in its tracks –  jpwynn Jul 1 '11 at 20:34

I just clear the @to field and return, so deliver aborts when it doesn't have anything there. (Or just return before setting @to).

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It may abort but you know this is a crap answer. If there's CC/BCC the email will still go out and additionally, since this is a hack there's no guarantee that this will not throw huge errors in the future. –  Chuck Vose Nov 3 '11 at 17:30
    
it's more elegant than the (current) top solution. The great elegance vs. complication tradeoff. Rails clearly needs to add something. –  Kevin Nov 8 '11 at 6:25

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