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I currently have the following line of code

elseif($_POST['aspam'] != 'fire'){
print "Is ice really hotter than fire?";
}

Is there any sort of OR function within PHP? as if to say if...

$_POST['aspam'] != 'fire' OR !='Fire'

OR alternatively make my value not case sensitive? Hopefully this makes sense...

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13 Answers 13

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The || or or (lowercase) operator.

elseif($_POST['aspam'] != 'fire' || $_POST['aspam'] != 'Fire'){
    print "Is ice really hotter than fire?";
}
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Sure.

$_POST['aspam'] != 'fire' or $_POST['aspam'] !='Fire'

Just remember that each condition is separate. Saying or != 'Fire' doesn't automatically interpret it as or $_POST['aspam'] != 'Fire'.

They're called logical operators.

To compare the lowercase:

strtolower($_POST['aspam'] != 'fire'
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that simple?! brilliant, thankyou –  Liam Jul 1 '11 at 18:43
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You can do two conditions like this:

if($_POST['aspam'] != 'fire' || $_POST['aspam'] != 'Fire')

If I were you in this case, I would do:

if(strtolower($_POST['aspam']) != 'fire')
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A PHP OR is created with ||, AND created with &&, etc. So your code example would look like:

if ( ($_POST['aspam'] != 'fire') || ($_POST['aspam'] != 'Fire') )

However in your case it would be better to:

if (strtolower($_POST['aspam']) != 'fire')
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Yes.

if (first condition || second condition){
your code
}

The OR is represented by 2 pipes - ||

Something more: You can also have AND:

if(first condition && second condition){
Your code...
}

So and is represented by &&

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This is the logical OR

$_POST['aspam'] != 'fire' || !='Fire'

and this is the case-insensitive (ToLower function)

strtolower($_POST['aspam']) != 'fire'
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Thanks @jonathan, can I ask does the strtolower make my value all lowercase therefore no matter how its input it should work? –  Liam Jul 1 '11 at 18:44
    
    
@Liam: yes, that's what the strlower function does. So "Fire" or "FIRE" will have an output of "fire". php.net/manual/en/function.strtolower.php –  Ray Jul 1 '11 at 18:47
    
As they both noted: yep. :) –  Jonathan Jul 1 '11 at 18:49
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Use strtolower($_POST['aspam'] )!='fire'

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If you want to make the checking of your variable case insensitive, you can use below code

if(strtolower($_POST['aspam'])!='fire')
   echo "this is matching";
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OR alternatively make my value not case sensitive?

if (strtolower($_POST['aspam']) != 'fire'){

}
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There are different logical operators in PHP.

Use for "OR" two pipes: ||

$_POST['aspam'] != 'fire' || !='Fire'

Here's a link with all operators: http://www.w3schools.com/PHP/php_operators.asp

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Much better would be to link to the official documentation: php.net/manual/en/language.operators.logical.php –  Felix Kling Jul 1 '11 at 18:56
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Yes, this is possible. Try this:

elseif($_POST['aspam'] != 'fire' || $_POST['aspam'] != 'Fire')
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You could use case insensitive string comparison:

if (strcasecmp($_POST['aspam'], 'fire') !== 0) {
    print "Is ice really hotter than fire?"; 
}

Or a list:

if (!in_array($_POST['aspam'], array('Fire','fire')) {
    ...
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The shortest option here would probably be stristr:

if (stristr($_POST["aspam"], "FIRE")) {

It does a case-insensitive search. To make it a fixed-length match you might however need strcasecmp or strncasecmp in your case. (However I find that less readable, and doesn't look necessary in your case.)

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