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my code is:

public class Register_window extends javax.swing.JFrame
{
    String u;
.
.
.
    private void jButton1ActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) 
    {
        try
        {
            .
            .
            u=jTextField.getText();

            .
            .
        }
    }
}



public class Data_storer extends Register_window
{
    public Vector people_database() throws Exception 
    {
        .
        .
        .

        System.out.println("The name of the user as printed in Data_storer(inherited from Register_window) is:" + u);
        .
        .
        .
    }
}
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when i am printing the string u in the class Data_storer the value being shown is null/......Please Help buddies....Thanking in advance for any help! –  kosmicbug Jul 1 '11 at 19:36
    
put the question in the.. question, not the comments, and format it better, please.. or.. I don't know if you can edit, yet, but someone please edit this? –  Lacrymology Jul 1 '11 at 19:41
    
when i printed the string u in the boldclass Register_window it is exactly showing the string entered ...but when i am printing it in the Data_storer class the value shown is null!! –  kosmicbug Jul 1 '11 at 19:43
    
Please see edit to my answer. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 1 '11 at 21:12

3 Answers 3

You need to initialize u. You're making the assumption that jButton1ActionPerformed is called before people_database.

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The problem really is misuse of inheritance. Data_storer doesn't truly fulfill the "is-a" criteria for Register_window. In other words, it's not really a Register_window kind of animal but is only inheriting Register_window so that it can have access to the u variable, but this will necessarily fail since as dlev has pointed out, the two u's are completely distinct. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 1 '11 at 20:48

Are you sure you're actually assigning anything to u? If you never click jbutton1 (and thus jButton1ActionPerformed isn't called) then u really will be null.

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No the jbutton1ActionPerformed is called.It is actually the "Create Account" button,that puts the user's desired login name to the string u.After this a class named Friend_Database is called that retrieves the data from the Data_storer class.But since Data_storer gives a null value for the string u,i am not able to access the desired login name of the user from the Friend_database class. –  kosmicbug Jul 1 '11 at 19:58
    
Do you have an instance of the parent class (where you click the button) and a different instance of the child class? –  dlev Jul 1 '11 at 20:03
    
yes i am assigning a value to u...how else does it display the string in the class Register_window –  kosmicbug Jul 1 '11 at 20:06
1  
My point is that if there are two objects, then they're not going to share data. Inheritance means that Data_storer will have a u field. It doesn't mean that setting the value of u in an object of the parent class will change the value of u in a different object of the child class. –  dlev Jul 1 '11 at 20:07
1  
There's nothing wrong with that. But I'm almost 100% certain that the object on which jButton1ActionPerformed is not the same object that is trying to access u. That's a problem, since the u in one object instance is different from the u in another object instance. What you should be doing is creating the window to be of type Data_storer, rather than type Register_window. –  dlev Jul 1 '11 at 20:18

Your problem is akin to this:

public class FooA {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      A a = new A();
      a.setFieldA("bar");

      B b = new B();
      System.out.println(b.getFieldA()); // this will still print "foo"
   }
}

class A {
   String fieldA = "foo";

   public void setFieldA(String a) {
      this.fieldA = a;
   }

   public String getFieldA() {
      return fieldA;
   }
}

class B extends A {

}

If you make changes to fieldA in object a, it will not effect object b since they both carry distinct fieldA's. The way to solve this is to not extend A, but construct your second class like class C, to use a reference to the current A object and then extract necessary information from the A object as needed:

class C {
   private A a;

   C(A a) {
      this.a = a;
   }

   public String getAFieldA() {
      return a.getFieldA();
   }
}

Then in the main you could do:

public class FooA {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      A a = new A();
      a.setFieldA("bar");

      B b = new B();
      System.out.println(b.getFieldA()); // this will still print "foo"

      C c = new C(a); 
      System.out.println(c.getAFieldA()); // this will print "bar"
   }
}

Translated into your code, it would look something like so:

public class Register_window extends javax.swing.JFrame {
   private JTextField jTextField = new JTextField();
   // String u; // this is not necessary

   // ...

   private void jButton1ActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {
      try {
         // ...

         // somehow notify Data_storer that a field has changed.

         // ...
      } finally {

      }
   }

   public String getTextFieldText() {
      return jTextField.getText();
   }
}

And the Data_storer class:

public class Data_storer extends Register_window {
   private Register_window registerWindow;

   // pass the current visualized Register_window instance into constructor       
   public Data_storer(Register_window register_window) {
      this.registerWindow = register_window;
   }

   public Vector people_database() throws Exception {
      // ...

      System.out.println("The name of the user as printed in Data_storer(inherited from Register_window) is:"
                        + registerWindow.getTextFieldText());
      // ...

   }
}

Another possible solution is to turn things around, to have your GUI hold an instance of the data storer, and have it "push" information into the data storer object on button push, and this actually makes more sense to me. For instance:

public class Register_window extends javax.swing.JFrame {
   private JTextField jTextField = new JTextField();
   private Data_storer dataStorer = new Data_storer();

   // ...

   private void jButton1ActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {
      try {
         // ...
         Vector vect = dataStorer.people_database(jTextField.getText());
         // do something with the vect here

      } 

      //...
   }

}

class Data_storer extends Register_window {


   public Vector people_database(String text) {

      //...
   }
}
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