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I have been learning Objective-C with the Kochan book and I can't figure out how to do this exercise program. Only odd numbered exercises are listed online and this one is even. The exercise is to convert numbers into words. So, if "932" was entered, the program should return: "nine three two"

I used a do, while loop but the words came out backwards, as in "two three nine". Can anyone suggest a technique that works for this?

int number, digit;


NSLog(@"Type in your integer.");
scanf("%i", &number);


 do
 {
     digit = number % 10;

     if (digit == 0)
         NSLog(@"zero");
     if (digit == 1)
         NSLog(@"one");
     if (digit == 2)
         NSLog(@"two");
     if (digit == 3)
         NSLog(@"three");
     if (digit == 4)
         NSLog(@"four");
     if (digit == 5)
         NSLog(@"five");
     if (digit == 6)
         NSLog(@"six");
     if (digit == 7)
         NSLog(@"seven");
     if (digit == 8)
         NSLog(@"eight");
     if (digit == 9)
         NSLog(@"nine");

     number /= 10;
 }
while (number != 0);
share|improve this question
1  
@Nadeem If your result is "two three nine", you're probably looping from the ones digit up, and you want to loop from the top digit down. Please post your code and we'll help. –  CajunLuke Jul 1 '11 at 20:55
1  
Thanks guys I posted the code, I didn't let me post under someone's name that's why it took so long, then I realized my OP needed the code in it. Also just to let you guys know: I know why it's wrong, I just don't know the method to make it right. –  Nadeem Jul 1 '11 at 21:09

6 Answers 6

This isn't exactly what you want, but for your consideration:

NSNumberFormatter *f = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init];
[f setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterSpellOutStyle];

NSString *s = [f stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithInt:932]];
NSLog(@"%@", s);
[f release];

This will log:

nine hundred and thirty-two

Again, it's not the "nine three two" you want, but it's also nice and short. :)

share|improve this answer
    
DeLong Still learning, so I modified your code. –  JAL Jul 1 '11 at 23:09
    
nice piece of code. –  Hayaßusa Aug 10 '13 at 5:48

Since you're adding the numbers to a string, and you want to calculate them right to left, prepend the string with each new number. Something like:

numberString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@", theNewNumber, numberString];

Where theNewNumber is a string (like @"six") and numberString is the string that you want to output once you're done...

(oh, and don't forget to initialize numberString before you start looping...something like:

NSString *numberString = @"";

=====

Based on the code you just posted, you could either do it mathematically, or just pre-pend a string like this:

Put this variable in your .h file:

NSString *numberString;

Then put this in your .m:

- (void) prependNumber:(NSString *)num {
  numberString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@", num, numberString];
}

NSLog(@"Type in your integer.");
scanf("%i", &number);
numberString = @"";


 do
 {
     digit = number % 10;

     if (digit == 0)
         [self prependNumber:@"zero"];
     if (digit == 1)
         [self prependNumber:@"one"];
     if (digit == 2)
         [self prependNumber:@"two"];
     if (digit == 3)
         [self prependNumber:@"three"];
     if (digit == 4)
         [self prependNumber:@"four"];
     if (digit == 5)
         [self prependNumber:@"five"];
     if (digit == 6)
         [self prependNumber:@"six"];
     if (digit == 7)
         [self prependNumber:@"seven"];
     if (digit == 8)
         [self prependNumber:@"eight"];
     if (digit == 9)
         [self prependNumber:@"nine"];

     number /= 10;
 }
while (number != 0);

NSLog (@"%@", numberString);
share|improve this answer
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    int a, b, number, logNum, nThNum;

    NSLog(@"Please enter a valid integer: ");
    scanf("%d", &number); // read input as a decimal integer

    if (!number) // if zero or something other than a number is entered output zero
        NSLog(@"Zero");
    else if (number < 0) { // convert negatives to something that can be used
        number = -number;
        NSLog(@"(negative)"); // but output negative first then continue as usual
    }

    logNum = (log10(number) + 1); // find how many digits there are in the number

    for (int j=0; j < logNum; j++) {// loop based on number of digits
        a = pow(10,logNum-j);
        b = pow(10,logNum-1-j);
        nThNum = (number % a) / b;// find the nth digit in a number, in our case 1st
        switch (nThNum) {// output current digit that was found
            case 0:
                NSLog(@"Zero");
                break;
            case 1:
                NSLog(@"One");
                break;
            case 2:
                NSLog(@"Two");
                break;
            case 3:
                NSLog(@"Three");
                break;
            case 4:
                NSLog(@"Four");
                break;
            case 5:
                NSLog(@"Five");
                break;
            case 6:
                NSLog(@"Six");
                break;
            case 7:
                NSLog(@"Seven");
                break;
            case 8:
                NSLog(@"Eight");
                break;
            case 9:
                NSLog(@"Nine");
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }
    }

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

Well, now that you've posted your code, your method will work great if you first reverse the number. So, you can just write a short routine to do that, then use your own code.

share|improve this answer
    
Roughly the same as the solution I was going to post: keep exactly the same inner logic, switching on the current digit and directly logging the result, but find the highest digit and then iterate through them in the opposite order to the original code. Other solutions posted here (such as using an NSString to accumulate the result, effectively like a stack) would work just as well, but I think this is closest to the original throughput. –  Tommy Jul 1 '11 at 21:12
    
Is there anything simpler than that? –  Nadeem Jul 1 '11 at 21:29
    
@Nadeem. Sure. You're method works great for the reversed number. Write a short function that reverses the input number and then apply your method. My method treats the number as a number and grabs digits, but you could also convert to a string and grab chars. There are many solutions out there, I'm sure. –  PengOne Jul 1 '11 at 21:32

Well it sounds like you're halfway there if you were able to get the numbers to convert to words already, even if output backwards.

Assuming you're looping through your data, incrementing the index, just start at the character length of the number, decrementing your index backwards, reversing your output.

We can't help you much more without seeing your actual code. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry if I sound like a total noob, I just started learning last week: I don't quite understand how I would be able to work backwards. My current method was getting the right digit and printing right to left. I'm trying to figure out a way to display the digits left to right by somehow retrieving the left digit. –  Nadeem Jul 1 '11 at 20:59
1  
Well post the code where you are trying to accomplish this task, and I'm sure you will get plenty of answers ;) –  George Johnston Jul 1 '11 at 21:01

As a learning exercise, I modified Dave's code:

+(NSString*)doIt:(NSString*)inString delimiter:(NSString*)delimiter{
    NSNumberFormatter *f = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init];
    [f setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterSpellOutStyle];
    NSMutableString* outString= [[NSMutableString alloc]init];
    for (int i=0; i< [inString length]; i++) {
        unsigned char oneChar= [inString characterAtIndex:i];
        if (oneChar>47 && oneChar<58) {
            NSString* temp=[f stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithUnsignedChar:oneChar-48]];
            [outString appendFormat:@"%@",temp];
            [outString appendString:delimiter];
        }
    }
    [f release];
    [outString autorelease];
    return outString;
}
share|improve this answer
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

@autoreleasepool {

    // insert code here...
    int number;     //store the value the user enter
    int lastDigit;  //pick of the last digit of the integer
    int tempNum;    //a temporary storage of the integer the user enter
    int count = 0;  //used to count how many digits were entered
    int count2;     //going to be use as a duplicate of count



    NSLog(@"Enter an integer");
    scanf("%i", &number);
    tempNum = number;


    //Loop to find out how many digits were entered
    for (; number != 0; number /= 10) {
        count +=1;
        }

    //Loop to convert the numbers into words
    for (; count != 0; count -= 1) {
        count2 = count;     //set count2 to count so the for and while loop use them independently
        number = tempNum;   //restore the value entered by by the user to the number variable


        //Loop to reverse the order of the last digit

        while (count2 != 0) {           //loops to the same number of counts to get the first digit
            lastDigit = number % 10;    //picks off the last value in the integer
            number /= 10;               //enables the loop to set the last value of the integer to zero
            count2 -=1;                 //loops one less time to get the numbers from front to back

        }
        //switch statements
        switch (lastDigit) {
            case 9:
                NSLog(@"nine");
                break;
            case 8:
                NSLog(@"eight");
                break;
            case 7:
                NSLog(@"seven");
                break;
            case 6:
                NSLog(@"six");
                break;
            case 5:
                NSLog(@"five");
                break;
            case 4:
                NSLog(@"four");
                break;
            case 3:
                NSLog(@"three");
                break;
            case 2:
                NSLog(@"two");
                break;
            case 1:
                NSLog(@"one");
                break;
            case 0:
                NSLog(@"zero");
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }
    }
   }
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This was my way of solving this problem using the basics of objective C. It took some time to figure out, but I hope it helps anyone just beginning to learn the language. –  user2669841 Aug 10 '13 at 5:20

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