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For example, do you use accessors and mutators within your method definitions or just access the data directly? Sometimes, all the time or when in Rome?

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I'd call this one a dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/99688/… –  Dana Mar 17 '09 at 17:52
    
That thread seems to be talking about a class communicating with the outside world, I'm not. –  Derek E Mar 17 '09 at 17:57
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Always try to use accessors, even inside the class. The only time you would want to access state directly and not through the public interface is if for some reason you needed to bypass the validation or other logic contained in the accessor method.

Now if you find yourself in the situation where you do need to bypass that logic you ought to step back and ask yourself whether or not this need betrays a flaw in your design.

Edit: Read Automatic vs Explicit Properties by Eric Lippert in which he delves into this very issue and explains things very clearly. It is about C# specifically but the OOP theory is universal and solid.

Here is an excerpt:

If the reason that motivated the change from automatically implemented property to explicitly implemented property was to change the semantics of the property then you should evaluate whether the desired semantics when accessing the property from within the class are identical to or different from the desired semantics when accessing the property from outside the class.

If the result of that investigation is “from within the class, the desired semantics of accessing this property are different from the desired semantics of accessing the property from the outside”, then your edit has introduced a bug. You should fix the bug. If they are the same, then your edit has not introduced a bug; keep the implementation the same.

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In general, I prefer accessors/mutators. That way, I can change the internal implementation of a class, while the class functions in the same way to an external user (or preexisting code that I dont want to break).

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The accessors are designed so that you can add property specific logic. Such as

int Degrees
{
    set
    {
        _degrees = value % 360;
    }
}

So, you would always want to access that field through the getter and setter, and that way you can always be certain that the value will never get greater than 360.

If, as Andrew mentioned, you need to skip the validation, then it's quite possible that there is a flaw in the design of the function, or in the design of the validation.

Accessors and Mutators are designed to ensure consistency of your data, so even within your class you should always strive to make sure that there's no possible way of injecting unvalidated data into those fields.

EDIT

See this question as well: OO Design: Do you use public properties or private fields internally?

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I don't tend to share with the outside world the 'innards' of my classes and so my internal needs for data (the private method stuff) tends to not do the same sort of stuff that my public interface does, typically.

It is pretty uncommon that I'll write an accessor/mutator that a private method will call, but I suspect I'm in the minority here. Maybe I should do more of this, but I don't tend to.

Anyway, that's my [patina covered] two cents.

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I will often start with private auto properties, then refactor if necessary. I'll refactor to a property with a backing field, then replace the backing field with the "real" store, for instance Session or ViewState for an ASP.NET application.

From:

    private int[] Property { get; set; }

to

    private int[] _property;
    private int[] Property
    {
        get { return _property; }
        set { _property = value; }
    }

to

    private int[] _property;
    private int[] Property
    {
        get
        {
            if (_property == null)
            {
                _property = new int[8];
            }
            return _property;
        }
        set { _property = value; }
    }

to

    private int[] Property
    {
        get
        {
            if (ViewState["PropertyKey"] == null)
            {
                ViewState["PropertyKey"] = new int[8];
            }
            return (int[]) ViewState["PropertyKey"];
        }
        set { ViewState["PropertyKey"] = value; }
    }

Of course, I use ReSharper, so this takes less time to do than to post about.

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