Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an assembly which contains several UserControl objects that I want to be able to save/load via the application UI. To do this, each control implements the ISerializable interface to customize the fields they need to save.

Here's a simplified version of that library:

namespace LibraryProject
{
    using System;
    using System.Runtime.Serialization;
    using System.Windows.Forms;

    [Serializable]
    public partial class UserControl1 : UserControl, ISerializable
    {
        public UserControl1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        public UserControl1(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext ctxt)
            : this()
        {
            this.checkBox1.Checked = info.GetBoolean("Checked");
        }

        public void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
        {
            info.AddValue("Checked", this.checkBox1.Checked);
        }
    }
}

The client application instantiates several of this controls, and allows the user saving/loading the various UserControl configurations. Here's a simplified version of the application:

namespace ApplicationProject
{
    using System;
    using System.IO;
    using System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Soap;
    using System.Windows.Forms;
    using LibraryProject;

    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        private const string filename = @"test.xml";

        //int hash1;
        //int hash2;

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            //hash1 = this.ctrl1.GetHashCode();
        }

        private void SaveClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            using (var stream = File.Open(filename, FileMode.Create))
            {
                var formatter = new SoapFormatter();

                formatter.Serialize(stream, this.ctrl1);
            }
        }

        private void LoadClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            using (var stream = File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open))
            {
                var formatter = new SoapFormatter();

                this.ctrl1= (UserControl1)formatter.Deserialize(stream);
            }

            //hash2 = this.ctrl1.GetHashCode();
        }
    }
}

On SaveClick, the values are properly saved to file. On LoadClick, the CheckBox.Checked is properly updated in the Debugger Watch list, but the UI doesn't reflect the new value.

I have tried adding calls to Refresh(), Invalidate(), Update(), but nothing seems to work.

As expected, hash1 and hash2 are different, but Form1 uses the correct instance.

What am I doing wrong, and how can I fix the UI to display the correct (updated) value?

EDIT: Also, notice that I need to handle multiple config files, that the user must have the ability to save/load to/from a path of her choice

share|improve this question
3  
Personally I would suggest serializing the application's data, not the UI state. For info, also; SoapFormatter is obsolete –  Marc Gravell Jul 1 '11 at 22:14
    
Give this a shot. Make the UI updation using the dispatcher instead of doing it directly. this.Dispatcher.Invoke( (Action)delegate { this.checkBox1.Checked = info.GetBoolean("Checked"); }, null); –  Anand Jul 1 '11 at 22:26
    
@Marc Gravell: it's a good suggestion to work on the data. Thanks, but still doesn't solve the issue. –  Gustavo Mori Jul 1 '11 at 23:11
    
@Anand: Unfortunately, still no luck either way. –  Gustavo Mori Jul 1 '11 at 23:12
1  
@Gustavo - "but still doesn't solve the issue" which is why I didn't post it as an answer ;p But fundamentally, IMO the UI state shouldn't be serialized, so (subjectively) you're trying to solve the wrong problem. Reasons: UI changes between platforms and versions; data doesn't. Perhaps more importantly, UI APIs often aren't designed to be serializable like this. –  Marc Gravell Jul 2 '11 at 6:09
show 1 more comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure but I'm going to guess it's because InitializeComponent doesn't get called.

But to solve your problem, it is better to serialize a surrogate. Just make little surrogate classes marked [Serializable] and copy properties from the UserControl to the surrogate before serialization. Then you don't have to mess around with GetObjectData - the serialization process just assumes every property of the surrogate should be serialized.

The deserialization process will give you a surrogate back. The surrogate just has to know how to instantiate a UserControl and map the properties back to it.

And if you define a common interface, you don't have to know which specific type of UserControl you are deserializing:

var surrogate = formatter.Deserialize(stream) as ISerializationSurrogate;
UserControl uc = surrogate.Create();
this.Controls.Add(uc);

Here's an example of how a surrogate might look:

[Serializable]
public class MySurrogate: ISerializationSurrogate
{
    public MySurrogate() {}

    public MySurrogate(MyControl control)
    {
        CB1Checked = control.checkBox1.Checked;
    }

    public bool CB1Checked { get; set; }

    public Control Create()
    {
        var control = new MyControl();
        control.checkBox1.Checked = CB1Checked;
        return control;
    }
}

Update

Actually, I bet the problem is that you're simply reassigning this.ctrl, which doesn't change which controls are on the form. What you actually need to do is something like this:

this.Controls.Remove(existingControl); // if it exists
this.Controls.Add(newControl);

But you should still use serialization surrogates. They make this kind of stuff much easier.

share|improve this answer
    
That would work, but it would leave out lots of other default settings that would need to be cloned from the original control. –  Gustavo Mori Jul 2 '11 at 18:13
    
Well if they are default settings they wouldn't need to be serialized - you would get them just by instantiating the control. But if there are a lot of non-default settings that are the result of e.g the Windows Forms Designer, then you are right (and your answer isn't a bad way to handle it in that case) –  default.kramer Jul 2 '11 at 23:53
    
Yes, that's a detail I forgot to mention. I've edited the question to note that. –  Gustavo Mori Jul 3 '11 at 2:51
    
Marked as the answer, not because it's what I did, but because your update is what inspired me on the way to my final answer. –  Gustavo Mori Jul 15 '11 at 1:37
add comment

I have a sneaky suspicion that the UI isn't update because it isn't yet visible. I have found controls with a visible property set to false sometimes act up.

You are really better off serializing the data in some structured format and then using that to instantiate a control and populate the controls. Something like this (untested):

public class UserControlData
{
    public string Type { get; set; } // or assembly qualified type
    public List<ControlValue> ControlValues { get; set; }
}

public class ControlValue
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public object Value { get; set; }
}

public interface IControlPersistence
{
    List<ControlValue> GetControlValues();
    void SetControlValues(List<ControlValue> controlValues);
}

Then serialize / deserialize the user control data and instantiate and set values from the definitions. After you have instantiated and added the user control it can update its control values independently from the instantiation --- or even only once it is visible (should that endup being the issue).

I would also suggest wrapping the XmlSerializer and using that for serialization (maybe something like IObjectSerializer / XmlObjectSerializer : IObjectSerializer).

Hope that makes sense.

share|improve this answer
    
I will definitely investigate how to use this UI update pattern. Thank you for the suggestion. –  Gustavo Mori Jul 2 '11 at 18:14
add comment

In the end, I ended up adding an interface method to push the serialized data into existing components, which was a very small code change. To illustrate in the mock up provided above, here's what I did:

Add an interface for loading settings. In my actual project, this was just a new method on the interface supported by the controls in my library, and since the app is still in development, this isn't a breaking change. For this mock up, I added the interface ICopyFrom:

public interface ICopyFrom
{
    void CopyFrom(UserControl control);
}

Change all serializable components to implement this interface. In the mock up, it's only UserControl1. The implementation on each class casts the input control to its own type, and then copies the required properties:

public void CopyFrom(UserControl control)
{
    using (var source = control as UserControl1)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        // copy properties
        this.checkBox1.Checked= source.checkBox1.Checked;
    }
}

And finally, change the LoadClick event handler to use this mechanism to update the existing controls:

private void LoadClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    using (var stream = File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open))
    {
        var formatter = new SoapFormatter();

        this.ctrl11.CopyFrom((UserControl1)formatter.Deserialize(stream));
    }
}

While this works, it's not very elegant. And there's the suggestion of decoupling UI from data. However, making this change requires more time than I can devote to this right now, so I've punted it for the next revision.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.