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I'm working on a kind of parameter values parser library. I'd like to have an Parser defined as follows:

public class Parser {

    private ValuesConfiguration configuration;
    private ValuesProvider valuesProvider;
    private ValuesMapper valuesMapper;

    public Parser(ValuesConfiguration configuration) {
        this.configuration = configuration;
    }

    public Result parse(String parameterName) {
        List<Values> values = valuesProvider.getValues(parameterName);
        // do other stuff on values
        // ...
        return valuesMapper.transformValues(values, configuration);
    }
}

I'd like this library clients to be unaware of ValuesProvider and ValuesMapper default implementations and use it like

Result result = new Parser(myConfig).parse("sampleParam");

Although there must be possibility to set their own implementations when needed. I wonder how and where should I init those default implementations and still let clients to set their own if they want. I don't want to stick to

new DefaultValuesProvider()

etc. in constructor, because default implementation would e.g. access filesystem, so that it would be hard to test (mock them out). I know I can use setters (like in DI) but what about defaults?

EDIT: After your all answer, I guess it is best here to have setters to allow clients to provider their own implementations of ValuesProvider and ValuesMapper. But how to create default implementations? I'd like to decouple instantiation from logic, so I don't want to use new DefaultValueProvider() here. Is the factory pattern applicable here? If so how and where should I use it?

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Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2045904/dependency-inject-di-friendly-library/204765‌​7#2047657 –  Mark Seemann Jul 2 '11 at 7:41
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about:

public void setValuesProvider(ValuesProvider valuesProvider) {
    this.valuesProvider = valuesProvider;
}

public Result parse(String parameterName) {
    if (valuesProvider == null) {
        valuesProvider = new DefaultValuesProvider();
    }

    List<Values> values = valuesProvider.getValues(parameterName);
    // do other stuff on values
    // ...
    return valuesMapper.transformValues(values, configuration);
}

As Mark points out, constructor injection might be the better way to go. That would look as follows:

public Parser(ValuesConfiguration configuration) {
    this(configuation, new DefaultValuesProvider());
}

public Parser(ValuesConfiguration configuration, ValuesProvider valuesProvider) {
    this.configuration = configuration;
    this.valuesProvider = valuesProvider;
}


public Result parse(String parameterName) {
    List<Values> values = valuesProvider.getValues(parameterName);
    // do other stuff on values
    // ...
    return valuesMapper.transformValues(values, configuration);
}

I also agree with his summary of advantages:

This would enable you to make the dependency final/readonly. Property Injection provides quite weak guarantees about invariants - e.g. you could keep changing the dependency on the same instance, and that's probably not what you want.

However, there are also disadvantages:

  1. The number of constructors is exponential in the number of optional parameters, causing a lot of delegation and duplicated JavaDoc for the parameters. Therefore, I'd only use constructor injection if there are few optional dependencies. You have 2, which about my pain threshold for this kind of thing.
  2. Constructor injection ist not very subclassing friendly, as the subclass constructors will have to redeclare the super class dependencies. In your case, a subclass that wishes to expose all configuration options will need 4 constructors ... and if it adds an optional parameter it better shouldn't to this with constructor injection, as this would require another 4 constructors.

My recommendation therefore is to use setter injection, and if it is necessary to prevent the reassignment of dependences, do:

public void setValuesProvider(ValuesProvider valuesProvider) {
    if (this.valuesProvider != null) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Dependency already set");
    }
    this.valuesProvider = valuesProvider;
}
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+1 but difficult to put it on resume. "know how to do basic stuff". might be a rare quality these days. –  irreputable Jul 2 '11 at 0:14
    
A better option might be a overloaded constructor. This would enable you to make the dependency final/readonly. Property Injection provides quite weak guarantees about invariants - e.g. you could keep changing the dependency on the same instance, and that's probably not what you want. –  Mark Seemann Jul 2 '11 at 7:44
    
if you assume malicious code, nothing can save you. –  irreputable Jul 2 '11 at 9:10
    
That was partially what I was thinking about, but I'd like to be able to decouple logic from object construction. DI frameworks seem to be too much for such a small lib. Overloading constructor seems ok, but there is still need to provide defaults. Maybe abstract factory for defaults and as a dependency to decouple creation from logic? –  grafthez Jul 2 '11 at 9:23
    
@meriton, having valuesProvider and valuesMapper here as dependencies would result with constructors number explosion as you mentioned. With your setter injection proposal there is no way to change default implementations. –  grafthez Jul 2 '11 at 13:26
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Use Google Guice or similiar Dependency Injection framework:

http://code.google.com/p/google-guice/

It's perfect for your needs. You can configure several modules describing what implementations will be instantiated for particular interfaces. You can have a ProductionModule and UnitTestModule for example.

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Clients need to depend on Guice. What if a client uses Spring? DI frameworks don't coexist very well. If Guice is used as a service locator, then there has be an agreed upon global place for the module. Might as well have a global factory that can be reassigned by client. –  irreputable Jul 2 '11 at 0:11
    
You can use spring as well. Spring has similar features as Guice. Spring's ApplicationContext I believe provides Guice's model functionality (see for example here: blog.springsource.com/2007/05/14/…). Guice is much cleaner IMHO. Dependency Injection is so much more powerful than factories. Less boilerplate, huge flexibility very nice and readable code. Once you try it, there is no going back. –  Jarek Potiuk Jul 2 '11 at 7:55
    
OP is making a library, it's wrong to require clients to use a specific DI framework. –  irreputable Jul 2 '11 at 9:09
1  
Thanks for pointing DI frameworks here but I wonter if it isn't too heavy for such small library to use Spring or Guice? –  grafthez Jul 2 '11 at 9:20
    
Guice is very lightweight. If you have one or two classes, then it's true - more overhead can come from requiring an extra dependency and configuration than benefits. I in fact missed the "library" word (I should have read it more carefully) and I agree in this case that would be an overkill ... My bad, sorry for the confusion... –  Jarek Potiuk Jul 2 '11 at 9:42
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