Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

in a general binary search, we are looking for a value which appears in the array. Iometimes, we need looking for the first element that is greater/less than a target.

Here is a binary search code with my ugly solution:

  // assuming all element is greater than 0
  int bs(int[] a, int t) {

  int s = 0, e = a.length;
  int firstlarge = 1<<30; int firstlargeindex = -1;
  while(s<e){
     int m = (s+e)/2;
     if( a[m] > t )  // how can I know a[m] is the first larger than
     {
          if( a[m] < firstlarge ){ firstlarge = a[m]; firstlargeindex = m ;}
          e = m-1; 
     }
     else if( a[m] < ) go to the right part // how can i know is the first less than

  }

  }

Is there a more elegant solution for this kind of problem?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Is the array sorted? If so then binary search, if not then linear search... – YXD Jul 1 '11 at 22:59
    
it is a sorted array so that we can do binary search. In above code, I am using comparison to find the first greater or less element in the array – SecureFish Jul 1 '11 at 23:17
up vote 29 down vote accepted

A particularly elegant way of thinking about this problem is to think about doing a binary search over a transformed version of the array, where the array has been modified by applying the function

f(x) = 1 if x > target
       0 else

Now, the goal is to find the very first place that this function takes on the value 1. We can do that using a binary search as follows:

int low = 0, high = numElems; // numElems is the size of the array i.e arr.size() 
while (low != high) {
    int mid = (low + high) / 2; // Or a fancy way to avoid int overflow
    if (arr[mid] <= target) {
        /* This index, and everything below it, must not be the first element
         * greater than what we're looking for because this element is no greater
         * than the element.
         */
        low = mid + 1;
    }
    else {
        /* This element is at least as large as the element, so anything after it can't
         * be the first element that's at least as large.
         */
        high = mid;
    }
}
/* Now, low and high both point to the element in question. */

To see that this algorithm is correct, consider each comparison being made. If we find an element that's no greater than the target element, then it and everything below it can't possibly match, so there's no need to search that region. We can recursively search the left half. If we find an element that is larger than the element in question, then anything after it must also be larger, so they can't be the first element that's bigger and so we don't need to search them. The middle element is thus the last possible place it could be.

Note that on each iteration we drop off at least half the remaining elements from consideration. If the top branch executes, then the elements in the range [low, (low + high) / 2] are all discarded, causing us to lose floor((low + high) / 2) - low + 1 >= (low + high) / 2 - low = (high - low) / 2 elements.

If the bottom branch executes, then the elements in the range [(low + high) / 2 + 1, high] are all discarded. This loses us high - floor(low + high) / 2 + 1 >= high - (low + high) / 2 = (high - low) / 2 elements.

Consequently, we'll end up finding the first element greater than the target in O(lg n) iterations of this process.

EDIT: Here's a trace of the algorithm running on the array 0 0 1 1 1 1.

Initially, we have

0 0 1 1 1 1
L = 0       H = 6

So we compute mid = (0 + 6) / 2 = 3, so we inspect the element at position 3, which has value 1. Since 1 > 0, we set high = mid = 3. We now have

0 0 1
L     H

We compute mid = (0 + 3) / 2 = 1, so we inspect element 1. Since this has value 0 <= 0, we set mid = low + 1 = 2. We're now left with L = 2 and H = 3:

0 0 1
    L H

Now, we compute mid = (2 + 3) / 2 = 2. The element at index 2 is 1, and since 1 ≥ 0, we set H = mid = 2, at which point we stop, and indeed we're looking at the first element greater than 0.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please run an example of your solution, for example we have input 0,0,1,1,1,1. lets find the first element that is greater than 0. – SecureFish Jul 1 '11 at 23:39
    
Sure! Edit above. – templatetypedef Jul 1 '11 at 23:51
    
similarly, we can compose the func to find the first element smaller than t: if(a[m]>=t) high = m-1; else low = m; – SecureFish Jul 2 '11 at 0:03
    
It is similar that "find the last element that is less than target" – SecureFish Jul 6 '11 at 22:37
    
@SecureFish: Just to add this minor point: For this opposite problem it is also necessary to adjust the calculation of mid. Due to the combination of the round-down-effect in the division and the subtracting, it is possible to get negative high values without a modification. This could be solved by changing to a round-up-behavior in this calculation, for instance by adding the modulus 2 term again. – bluenote10 Jan 25 '13 at 9:07

You can use std::upper_bound if the array is sorted (assuming n is the size of array a[]):

int* p = std::upper_bound( a, a + n, x );
if( p == a + n )
     std::cout << "No element greater";
else
     std::cout << "The first element greater is " << *p
               << " at position " << p - a;
share|improve this answer

How about the following recursive approach:

    public static int minElementGreaterThanOrEqualToKey(int A[], int key,
        int imin, int imax) {

    // Return -1 if the maximum value is less than the minimum or if the key
    // is great than the maximum
    if (imax < imin || key > A[imax])
        return -1;

    // Return the first element of the array if that element is greater than
    // or equal to the key.
    if (key < A[imin])
        return imin;

    // When the minimum and maximum values become equal, we have located the element. 
    if (imax == imin)
        return imax;

    else {
        // calculate midpoint to cut set in half, avoiding integer overflow
        int imid = imin + ((imax - imin) / 2);

        // if key is in upper subset, then recursively search in that subset
        if (A[imid] < key)
            return minElementGreaterThanOrEqualToKey(A, key, imid + 1, imax);

        // if key is in lower subset, then recursively search in that subset
        else
            return minElementGreaterThanOrEqualToKey(A, key, imin, imid);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

My following implementation uses condition bottom <= top which is different from the answer of @templatetypedef.

int FirstElementGreaterThan(int n, const vector<int>& values) {
  int B = 0, T = values.size() - 1, M = 0;
  while (B <= T) { // B strictly increases, T strictly decreases
    M = B + (T - B) / 2;
    if (values[M] <= n) { // all values at or before M are not the target
      B = M + 1;
    } else {
      T = M - 1;// search for other elements before M
    }
  }
  return T + 1;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.