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I didn't found an explicit way to select all nodes that exist between two anchors (<a></a> tag pair) in an HTML file.

The first anchor has the following format:

<a href="file://START..."></a>

Second anchor:

<a href="file://END..."></a>

I've verified that both can be selected using starts-with (note that I'm using HTML Agility Pack):

HtmlNode n0 = html.DocumentNode.SelectSingleNode("//a[starts-with(@href,'file://START')]"));
HtmlNode n1 = html.DocumentNode.SelectSingleNode("//a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]"));

With this in mind, and with my amateurish XPath skills, I wrote the following expression to get all tags between the two anchors:

html.DocumentNode.SelectNodes("//*[not(following-sibling::a[starts-with(@href,'file://START0')]) and not (preceding-sibling::a[starts-with(@href,'file://END0')])]");

This seems to work, but selects all HTML document!

I need to, for example for the following HTML fragment:

<html>
...

<a href="file://START0"></a>
<p>First nodes</p>
<p>First nodes
    <span>X</span>
</p>
<p>First nodes</p>
<a href="file://END0"></a>

...
</html>

remove both anchors, the three P (including of course the inner SPAN).

Any way to do this?

I don't know if XPath 2.0 offers better ways to achieve this.

*EDIT (special case!) *

I should also handle the case where:

"Select tags between X and X', where X is <p><a href="file://..."></a></p>"

So instead of:

<a href="file://START..."></a>
<!-- xhtml to be extracted -->
<a href="file://END..."></a>

I should handle also:

<p>
  <a href="file://START..."></a>
</p>
<!-- xhtml to be extracted -->

<p>
  <a href="file://END..."></a>
</p>

Thank you very much, again.

share|improve this question
1  
Good question, +1. See my answer for two solutions (XPath 1.0 and XPath 2.0), explanation and their verification with XSLT as the host of XPath. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 2 '11 at 6:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use this XPath 1.0 expression:

//a[starts-with(@href,'file://START')]/following-sibling::node()
     [count(.| //a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]/preceding-sibling::node())
     =
      count(//a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]/preceding-sibling::node())
     ]

Or, use this XPath 2.0 expression:

    //a[starts-with(@href,'file://START')]/following-sibling::node()
  intersect
    //a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]/preceding-sibling::node()

The XPath 2.0 expression uses the XPath 2.0 intersect operator.

The XPath 1.0 expression uses the Kayessian (after @Michael Kay) formula for the intersectioon of two node-sets:

$ns1[count(.|$ns2) = count($ns2)]

Verification with XSLT:

This XSLT 1.0 transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
  "    //a[starts-with(@href,'file://START')]/following-sibling::node()
         [count(.| //a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]/preceding-sibling::node())
         =
          count(//a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]/preceding-sibling::node())
         ]
  "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<html>...
    <a href="file://START0"></a>
    <p>First nodes</p>
    <p>First nodes    
        <span>X</span>
    </p>
    <p>First nodes</p>
    <a href="file://END0"></a>...
</html>

produces the wanted, correct result:

<p>First nodes</p>
<p>First nodes    
        <span>X</span>
</p>
<p>First nodes</p>

This XSLT 2.0 transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
  " //a[starts-with(@href,'file://START')]/following-sibling::node()
   intersect
    //a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]/preceding-sibling::node()
  "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the same XML document (above) again produces exactly the wanted result.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Even if it's clear to me when the XPath 1.0 Kayessian formula comes in help, it is always hard to me realize how to apply it in the various situations; while I can easily read the XPath 2.0 intersection. This example however is really useful. –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 2 '11 at 6:06
    
@empo: You can visualize both of them with the XPath Visualizer :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 2 '11 at 6:09
    
I'm surprised HtmlAgilityPack SelectNodes method does not support XPath 2.0. –  Hernán Jul 3 '11 at 7:20
1  
@Hernan: There are few XPath 2.0 implementations and they usually come as part either of XSLT 2.0 processors or XQuery processors -- almost never standalone. We have a technology gap here and iti s going to widen as XPath 3.0 is moving towards becoming an official standard. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 3 '11 at 15:24
1  
Dimitry, I've added a special case that I should handle :P –  Hernán Jul 4 '11 at 3:09

I've added a special case that I should handle

To handle this special case you can work in the same way, I mean use the Kayessian (and use XPath Visualizer as well ;-)). The intersecting node-sets change as follows:

Intersecting node-set C

    "//p[.//a[starts-with(@href,'file://START')]]
         /following-sibling::node()"

All following sibling of p containing a START.

Intersecting node-set D

"./following-sibling::p[.//a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]]
    /preceding-sibling::node())"

All preceding siblings of p containing a END and following sibling of current p


Now you can perform the intersection as:

C ∩ D

That is

    "//p[.//a[starts-with(@href,'file://START')]]
            /following-sibling::node()[
            count(.| ./following-sibling::p
                     [.//a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]]
                       /preceding-sibling::node())
            =
            count(./following-sibling::p
                   [.//a[starts-with(@href,'file://END')]]
                     /preceding-sibling::node())
            ]"

If you need to manage both situations, you can proceed with the union of the intersecting node-sets as

(A ∩ B) ∪ (C ∩ D)

Where:

  • The XPath union operator | must be used:
  • the node-sets A e B are already showed in the @Dimitre'answer
  • the node-sets C e D are those showed in my answer.
share|improve this answer
    
awesome thank you very much! Seems XPath 2.0 makes those set operations much easier, unfortunately there is no 2.0 support in .NET 3! –  Hernán Jul 4 '11 at 12:02
    
It seems. You are allwed to write $n1 intersect $n2 in place of $n1[count(.|$n2)=count($n2)]. The selection of the node-sets is tricky anyway. –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 4 '11 at 12:11
    
You are welcome –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 4 '11 at 12:12
    
+1 for good thinking :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 4 '11 at 14:40
    
@Dimitre: Well, this means I was absolutely good! :D Thanks –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 4 '11 at 15:03

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