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I recently ran into an interesting but annoying F Sharp behavior. According to [1], “F# automatically caches the value of any function which takes no parameters.” This seems like a good idea, but it is causing problems for me as I try to come up with a wrapper function to generate random numbers.

As an example, I have two different functions in the code at the end of this question. The first function “getRand” takes no parameters, but unfortunately it always returns the same number. The second function “getRand2” works as I would expect generating a new random number each time it is called, but it annoyingly takes a useless and ignored extra parameter.

If possible, I would like to have the functionality of getRand2 but the convenience of getRand. Is there a compiler directive or special keyword I can apply to getRand that will turn off its function caching capabilities and thereby cause it to behave like getRand2?

With Thanks,

Shawn
Note: Forgive me if the answer already appears in [1], I’m just not seeing it right now.
[1] - http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/F_Sharp_Programming/Caching

(* Always returns the same number *)
let getRand = 
   let seed = int32(System.DateTime.Now.Ticks)   
   let randGen = new System.Random(seed)
   randGen.Next()

(* Works as expected except I need an annoying extra parameter *)
let getRand2 dummyParam = 
   let seed = int32(System.DateTime.Now.Ticks)   
   let randGen = new System.Random(seed)
   randGen.Next()

(* Outputs three "identical" numbers to console *)
System.Console.WriteLine(
   "Parameterless getRand always outputs same number.")
System.Console.WriteLine(getRand)
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100)
System.Console.WriteLine(getRand)
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100)
System.Console.WriteLine(getRand)
System.Console.WriteLine()

(* Outputs three "different" numbers to console *)
System.Console.WriteLine(
   "GetRand2 works as expected even though second dummy param is always the same.")
System.Console.WriteLine(getRand2 0)
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100)
System.Console.WriteLine(getRand2 0)
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100)
System.Console.WriteLine(getRand2 0)
System.Console.WriteLine()
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just to clarify a bit, I think that the phrase "function which takes no parameters" is misleading. By definition, a function maps a value from the function's domain to a value in the function's range, so all functions take parameters. In your case, getRand is not bound to a function, it's just a value of type int.

If I understand your question correctly, I think you want to do

let getRand =    
    let seed = int System.DateTime.Now.Ticks      
    let randGen = new System.Random(seed)   
    fun () -> randGen.Next()

You still need to call getRand as a function (getRand(), not just getRand), but there's no way to work around this - the fact that an int value always remains the same is a critical feature for reasoning about a program.

You could use your getRand2 function in much the same way as my version of getRand: since you don't use dummyParam within the body, F# makes the function generic, which means that you can pass the unit value () as the argument if you want. However, your getRand2 function is broken, in that it creates a new random number generator each time it is called. This means that if you call it twice within one tick, you will get the same answer:

let x,y = (getRand2(), getRand2())

That's why it's important to define seed and randGen outside of the scope of the anonymous function.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you are right. Your suggestion seems to work pretty good for me and it helped me to realize that I can simply change my getRand signature from "let getRand =" to "let getRand() =", but then I "still need to call getRand as a function (getRand(), not just getRand)...there's no way to work around this." - quote from kvb. Nevertheless, unless someone else posts a better reply you will get my answer vote!!! –  Shawn Eary Jul 2 '11 at 3:39
    
@Shawn - I've added a few more details since your comment. –  kvb Jul 2 '11 at 3:42
    
If I apply your reasoning that my getRand is not bound to a function but is simply a value of type int, then it makes sense as to why I keep getting the same value back. I appreciate this explanation. Furthermore, I agree with your statement that my getRand2 function is broke. You are right, I should definately define seed and randGen outside the scope of any function I choose to return via a getRand style construct. At this point, I believe you have nailed this question to the ground. With Thanks!!! –  Shawn Eary Jul 2 '11 at 4:06
    
@kvb - regarding there's no way to work around this, you can use members or static members. Since they are implemented using properties and not fields, they are evaluated when accessed and not "cached". If he had defined his getRand as a static member, he could have done let x, y = S.getRand, S.getRand. –  Ramon Snir Jul 2 '11 at 5:40
1  
Be aware that the current implementation of getRand will not work as expected, because there is no time difference between the executions. You should save the seed as a private field and reuse it. –  Ramon Snir Jul 2 '11 at 5:45

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