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Given the following scenario, I want map the type hierarchy to the database schema using Fluent NHibernate.

I am using NHibernate 2.0


Type Hierarchy

public abstract class Item
{
    public virtual int ItemId { get; set; }
    public virtual string ItemType { get; set; }
    public virtual string FieldA { get; set; }
}

public abstract class SubItem : Item
{
    public virtual string FieldB { get; set; } 
}

public class ConcreteItemX : SubItem
{
    public virtual string FieldC { get; set; } 
}

public class ConcreteItemY : Item
{
    public virtual string FieldD { get; set; }
}

See image

The Item and SubItem classes are abstract.


Database Schema

+----------+  +---------------+  +---------------+
| Item     |  | ConcreteItemX |  | ConcreteItemY |
+==========+  +===============+  +===============+
| ItemId   |  | ItemId        |  | ItemId        |
| ItemType |  | FieldC        |  | FieldD        |
| FieldA   |  +---------------+  +---------------+
| FieldB   |
+----------+

See image

The ItemType field determines the concrete type.

Each record in the ConcreteItemX table has a single corresponding record in the Item table; likewise for the ConcreteItemY table.

FieldB is always null if the item type is ConcreteItemY.


The Mapping (so far)

public class ItemMap : ClassMap<Item>
{
    public ItemMap()
    {
        WithTable("Item");
        Id(x => x.ItemId, "ItemId");
        Map(x => x.FieldA, "FieldA");

        JoinedSubClass<ConcreteItemX>("ItemId", MapConcreteItemX);
        JoinedSubClass<ConcreteItemY>("ItemId", MapConcreteItemY);
    }

    private static void MapConcreteItemX(JoinedSubClassPart<ConcreteItemX> part)
    {
        part.WithTableName("ConcreteItemX");
        part.Map(x => x.FieldC, "FieldC");
    }

    private static void MapConcreteItemY(JoinedSubClassPart<ConcreteItemY> part)
    {
        part.WithTableName("ConcreteItemX");
        part.Map(x => x.FieldD, "FieldD");
    }
}

FieldB is not mapped.


The Question

How do I map the FieldB property of the SubItem class using Fluent NHibernate?

Is there any way I can leverage DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn using the ItemType field?


Addendum

I am able to achieve the desired result using an hbm.xml file:

<class name="Item" table="Item">

  <id name="ItemId" type="Int32" column="ItemId">
    <generator class="native"/>
  </id>

  <discriminator column="ItemType" type="string"/>

  <property name="FieldA" column="FieldA"/>

  <subclass name="ConcreteItemX" discriminator-value="ConcreteItemX">
    <!-- Note the FieldB mapping here -->
    <property name="FieldB" column="FieldB"/>
    <join table="ConcreteItemX">
      <key column="ItemId"/>
      <property name="FieldC" column="FieldC"/>
    </join>
  </subclass>

  <subclass name="ConcreteItemY" discriminator-value="ConcreteItemY">
    <join table="ConcreteItemY">
      <key column="ItemId"/>
      <property name="FieldD" column="FieldD"/>
    </join>
  </subclass>

</class>

How do I accomplish the above mapping using Fluent NHibernate?

Is it possible to mix table-per-class-hierarchy with table-per-subclass using Fluent NHibernate?

share|improve this question
    
Any reason this is marked community wiki? In any case, could you clarify the mapping strategy you are using? JoinedSubClassPart implies the table-per-subclass pattern but saying concrete items are persisted to the Item table implies the table-per-class-hierarchy pattern. –  Stuart Childs Mar 17 '09 at 23:21
    
I'm not sure how to change the community wiki setting. Ignoring FieldB, I can use table-per-subclass. The presence of FieldB causes me some confusion. It seems to be a mixture of the two strategies. The ConcreteItemX type inherits FieldB from SubItem. FieldB is persisted in the Item table. –  Jim Mar 18 '09 at 5:06

4 Answers 4

I know this is really old, but it is now pretty simple to set up fluent to generate the exact mapping you initially desired. Since I came across this post when searching for the answer, I thought I'd post it.

You just create your ClassMap for the base class without any reference to your subclasses:

public class ItemMap : ClassMap<Item>
{
    public ItemMap()
    {
        this.Table("Item");
        this.DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn("ItemType");
        this.Id(x => x.ItemId, "ItemId");
        this.Map(x => x.FieldA, "FieldA");
    }
}

Then map your abstract subclass like this:

public class SubItemMap: SubclassMap<SubItemMap>
{
    public SubItemMap()
    {
        this.Map(x => x.FieldB);
    }
}

Then map your concrete subclasses like so:

public class ConcreteItemXMap : SubclassMap<ConcreteItemX>
{
    public ConcretItemXMap()
    {
        this.Join("ConcreteItemX", x =>
        {
            x.KeyColumn("ItemID");
            x.Map("FieldC")
        });
    }
}

Hopefully this helps somebody else looking for this type of mapping with fluent.

share|improve this answer

This is how I resolved my inheritance problem:

public static class DataObjectBaseExtension
{
    public static void DefaultMap<T>(this ClassMap<T> DDL) where T : IUserAuditable 
    {
        DDL.Map(p => p.AddedUser).Column("AddedUser");
        DDL.Map(p => p.UpdatedUser).Column("UpdatedUser");
    }
}

You can then add this to your superclass map constructor:

internal class PatientMap : ClassMap<Patient>
{
    public PatientMap()
    {
        Id(p => p.GUID).Column("GUID");
        Map(p => p.LocalIdentifier).Not.Nullable();
        Map(p => p.DateOfBirth).Not.Nullable();
        References(p => p.Sex).Column("RVSexGUID");
        References(p => p.Ethnicity).Column("RVEthnicityGUID");

        this.DefaultMap();
    }


}
share|improve this answer
    
great, thank you! –  vondip Nov 15 '10 at 11:22

Well, I'm not sure that it's quite right, but it might work... If anyone can do this more cleanly, I'd love to see it (seriously, I would; this is an interesting problem).

Using the exact class definitions you gave, here are the mappings:

public class ItemMap : ClassMap<Item>
{
	public ItemMap()
	{
		Id(x => x.ItemId);
		Map(x => x.ItemType);
		Map(x => x.FieldA);

		AddPart(new ConcreteItemYMap());
	}
}

public class SubItemMap : ClassMap<SubItem>
{
	public SubItemMap()
	{
		WithTable("Item");

		// Get the base map and "inherit" the mapping parts
		ItemMap baseMap = new ItemMap();
		foreach (IMappingPart part in baseMap.Parts)
		{
			// Skip any sub class parts... yes this is ugly
			// Side note to anyone reading this that might know:
			// Can you use GetType().IsSubClassOf($GenericClass$)
			// without actually specifying the generic argument such
			// that it will return true for all subclasses, regardless
			// of the generic type?
			if (part.GetType().BaseType.Name == "JoinedSubClassPart`1")
				continue;
			AddPart(part);
		}
		Map(x => x.FieldB);
		AddPart(new ConcreteItemXMap());
	}
}

public class ConcreteItemXMap : JoinedSubClassPart<ConcreteItemX>
{
	public ConcreteItemXMap()
		: base("ItemId")
	{
		WithTableName("ConcreteItemX");
		Map(x => x.FieldC);
	}
}

public class ConcreteItemYMap : JoinedSubClassPart<ConcreteItemY>
{
	public ConcreteItemYMap()
		: base("ItemId")
	{
		WithTableName("ConcreteItemY");
		Map(x => x.FieldD);
	}
}

Those mappings produce two hbm.xml files like so (some extraneous data removed for clarity):

  <class name="Item" table="`Item`">
    <id name="ItemId" column="ItemId" type="Int32">
      <generator class="identity" />
    </id>
    <property name="FieldA" type="String">
      <column name="FieldA" />
    </property>
    <property name="ItemType" type="String">
      <column name="ItemType" />
    </property>
    <joined-subclass name="ConcreteItemY" table="ConcreteItemY">
      <key column="ItemId" />
      <property name="FieldD">
        <column name="FieldD" />
      </property>
    </joined-subclass>
  </class>

  <class name="SubItem" table="Item">
    <id name="ItemId" column="ItemId" type="Int32">
      <generator class="identity" />
    </id>
    <property name="FieldB" type="String">
      <column name="FieldB" />
    </property>
    <property name="ItemType" type="String">
      <column name="ItemType" />
    </property>
    <property name="FieldA" type="String">
      <column name="FieldA" />
    </property>
    <joined-subclass name="ConcreteItemX" table="ConcreteItemX">
      <key column="ItemId" />
      <property name="FieldC">
        <column name="FieldC" />
      </property>
    </joined-subclass>
  </class>

It's ugly, but it looks like it might generate a usable mapping file and it's Fluent! :/ You might be able to tweak the idea some more to get exactly what you want.

share|improve this answer

The line of code: if (part.GetType().BaseType.Name == "JoinedSubClassPart1") can be rewritten as follows:

part.GetType().BaseType.IsGenericType && part.GetType().BaseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(JoinedSubClassPart<>)
share|improve this answer

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