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OK, well, I am a beginner, so.. yeah, this may be a very stupid question. I read that if I declare variable or object, without mentioniong the access-modifier (public, private, etc.) than it's automatically making it having the Internal acess modifier (and it will exist anywhere in the current namespace).

So why do I need to set my vars in a class as Public to get them in another class (such as my program's class of course).

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I'm pretty sure the default is private, not internal. –  BoltClock Jul 2 '11 at 4:54
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the default for top level types is internal –  Captain Comic Jul 2 '11 at 4:56
    
@Captain Comic: He said variables/objects, so he's probably referring to fields, not types. –  BoltClock Jul 2 '11 at 4:57
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Yeap, and I was trying to say that he (question author) probaly read about types –  Captain Comic Jul 2 '11 at 5:04
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Aside: you mention "vars", by which I assume you mean "fields". Fields shouldn't be exposed - they should be private. If you want to expose the data, use a property. –  Marc Gravell Jul 2 '11 at 6:12

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Because you can not read? Ok, joking aside. You said you are a eginner, so this is totally normal to overlook small things.

I read that if I declare variable or object, without mentioniong the access-modifier (public, private, etc.) than it's automatically making it having the Internal acess modifier

Ah, no. It defaults to private, NOT to internal. It defaults to the most sensible default, and internal would still allow a lot of cross class accesses that lead to bad code practices.

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Thank you so much! I read it again in a book, and the writer DID say it's Internal, but oh well. thanks for the help –  MasterMastic Jul 2 '11 at 4:59
    
Ah, here we go. Rule one: Books are not perfect. At least fal back to the official documenatation ;) –  TomTom Jul 2 '11 at 5:02
    
@Ken I have some curiosity to know what is that book? –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jul 2 '11 at 5:04
    
I suggest reading Albahari –  Captain Comic Jul 2 '11 at 5:11
    
I'd also add that public allows you use those classes in other assemblies. Internal is "global" within the assembly. –  Vince Panuccio Jul 2 '11 at 5:32

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