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Is there any way to find the lowest modulus of a list of integers? I'm not sure how to say it correctly, so I'm going to clarify with an example.

I'd like to input a list (mod x) and output the "same" list, modulus y (< x). For example, the list {0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16, 18, 22} (mod 24) is essentially the same as {0, 4} (mod 6).

Thank you for all your help.

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I a bit confused. Information is lost when you take a modulus. So after taking the list modulo x you can't in general recover the list mod y, e.g. when x and y are mutually prime. Can you clear up my confusion? –  Codie CodeMonkey Jul 2 '11 at 5:44
1  
@Ziga What is the "lowest modulus" of a list of integers? –  David Carraher Jul 2 '11 at 10:42
    
Hard to say without sounding too confusing :) I tried to clarify in the comment below. –  Ziga Jul 2 '11 at 11:02
4  
You really have to define your "equal". In what sense are {0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16, 18, 22} and {0, 4} equal? Is it that there exist a list O for which the following relation holds? O mod 24 == {0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16, 18, 22} and O mod 6 == {0, 4}, removing all duplicates, and are you looking for the smallest O? –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jul 2 '11 at 12:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are looking for a set of arithmetic sequences. We'll consider your example

ee = {0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16, 18, 22};

which has two such sequences, and an example with four of them.

ff = {0, 3, 7, 11, 17, 20, 24, 28, 34, 37, 41, 45};

In this second one we start with {0,3,7,11} and then increase by 17. So what is the general way to get from the nth term to the n+1th? If the set has k sequences (k=2 for ee and 4 for ff) then add the modulus to the n-k+1th term. What is the modulus? It is the difference between the nth and n-kth terms.

Putting this together and assuming we know k (we don't in general, but we'll get to that) we have a recurrence of the form f(n+1)=f(n-k+1) + (f(n)-f(n-k)). So we need to find a recurrence (if one exists), check that it is of the correct form, and post-process if so.

Here is code to do all this. Note that it in effect solves for k.

findArithmeticSequences[ll : {_Integer ..}] := With[
  {rec = FindLinearRecurrence[ll]},
  {Take[ll, Length[rec] - 1], ll[[Length[rec]]]} /;
   ListQ[rec] &&
    (rec === {1, 1, -1} || MatchQ[rec, {1, 0 .., 1, -1}])
  ]

(Afficionados of pure functions might prefer the variant below. Failure cases are handled a bit differently, for no compelling reason.)

findArithmeticSequences2[ll : {_Integer ..}] :=
 If[ListQ[#] &&
     (# === {1, 1, -1} || MatchQ[#, {1, 0 .., 1, -1}]), {Take[ll, 
      Length[#] - 1], ll[[Length[#]]]}, $Failed] &[
  FindLinearRecurrence[ll]]

Tests:

In[115]:= findArithmeticSequences[ee]

Out[115]= {{0, 4}, 6}

In[116]:= findArithmeticSequences[ff]

Out[116]= {{0, 3, 7, 11}, 17}

Note that one can "almost" do such problems by polynomial factorization (if the input has no partial sequences at the end). For example, the polynomial

In[117]:= poly = Plus @@ (x^ee)

Out[117]= 1 + x^4 + x^6 + x^10 + x^12 + x^16 + x^18 + x^22

factors into

(1+x^4)*(1+x^6+x^12+x^18)

which contains the needed information in a way that is easy to see. Unfortunately for this particular purpose, Factor will factor beyond this point, and obscure the information in so doing.

I keep wondering if there might be a signal processing way to go about this sort of thing, e.g. via DFTs. But I've not come up with anything.

Daniel Lichtblau

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Wow, thank you for this! It works nearly the way I want it to. Your method is just a bit "too restrictive". It doesn't return anything useful if 'FindLinearRecurrence' doesn't find any recurrence. I've modified your method a bit, so it suits my needs better. I hope you don't mind. Here's my code. I had a feeling it'd have to involve recurrence, I just don't have enough experience with Mathematica to implement it. Thank you again for your time! –  Ziga Jul 3 '11 at 9:27

Wow, thank you Daniel for this! It works nearly the way I want it to. Your method is just a bit "too restrictive". It doesn't return anything useful if 'FindLinearRecurrence' doesn't find any recurrence. I've modified your method a bit, so it suits my needs better. I hope you don't mind. Here's my code.

findArithmeticSequences[ll_List] := Module[{rec = FindLinearRecurrence[ll]}, If[! MatchQ[rec, {1, 0 ..., 1, -1}], Return[ll], Return[{ll[[Length[rec]]], Take[ll, Length[rec] - 1]}]; ]; ];

I had a feeling it'd have to involve recurrence, I just don't have enough experience with Mathematica to implement it. Thank you again for your time!

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Mod is listable, and you can remove duplicate elements by DeleteDuplicates. So

DeleteDuplicates[Mod[{0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16, 18, 22}, 6]]
(*
-> {0,4}
*)
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1  
Did you mean to write: DeleteDuplicates[Mod[Mod[{0, 4, 6, 10, 12, 16, 18, 22}, 24], 6]]? –  David Carraher Jul 2 '11 at 10:09
    
@David I understood that the input has already been taken mod 24 so does not need to again. But I guess it is a bit unclear from the question (and the example). –  acl Jul 2 '11 at 10:29
1  
I see. But I'm still puzzled about what Ziga is looking for. –  David Carraher Jul 2 '11 at 10:41
    
Thank you for all your answers. To further clarify, I'm trying to find the lowest 'y' so that the resulting list (mod 'y') is "equal" to original list (mod x). From the above example, 'y=6' is one option, but 'y=3' is even better as it results in '{0, 1} (mod 3)'. 'y=2', i.e. '{0} (mod 2)' is not good as in the original list some even numbers are missing. –  Ziga Jul 2 '11 at 10:48

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