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Can anyone provide the current definitive papers on 'sharding designs' currently used in large, live, concurrent multi-user multi-machine systems.

I mean where there is a large amount of live shared state - between interacting actors, and this shared state splits in half into two groups of actors.

JG


EDIT

The usage scenario I'm talking about is where you have > 1000 users across > 10 machines. The question is how do you make your shared state scale, but split at an appropriate time. Scenarios might be online chat window with > 10000 users, Google Shared spaces applets, or an MMO.

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Are you talking about things like Design Patterns? ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_pattern ) –  Ohad Kammar Jun 30 '11 at 19:49
    
I've read GOF. The usage scenario I'm talking about is where you have > 1000 users across > 10 machines. The question is how do you make your shared state scale, but split at an appropriate time. Scenarios might be online chat window with > 10000 users, Google Shared spaces applets, or an MMO. –  hawkeye Jun 30 '11 at 22:58
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I didn't say 'read GOF'. I was wondering what exactly are you looking for, and whether you are hoping to find something along the lines of a pattern. –  Ohad Kammar Jun 30 '11 at 23:44
    
Fair enough. In honesty I was going to spread the net as far wide as possible. If patterns are available - I'll take that. –  hawkeye Jul 1 '11 at 2:28
2  
I am not sure what the question is about, but it seems to be more related to software engineering than theoretical computer science. –  Jukka Suomela Jul 1 '11 at 18:12

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