Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In PHP, this associative array notation works outside of a class:

$array['a'] = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
$array['b'] = array('1', '2', '3', '4');

But inside a class, similar notation causes an error:

class Foo {
    protected $array['a'] = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
    protected $array['b'] = array('1', '2', '3', '4');
}

//Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '[', expecting ',' or ';'

And yet this works just fine:

class Foo {
    protected $array = array('a'=>array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'), 'b'=>array('1', '2', '3', '4'));
}

Any idea what's going on? The allowed notation can get really cumbersome with bigger arrays.

share|improve this question
    
What's wrong with splitting the last definition into separate lines, one per sub-array? –  BoltClock Jul 2 '11 at 7:10
    
Anyway, you're probably confusing class properties/fields with local variables. They are two entirely different things. You can't say $array['a'] and $array['b'] are distinct protected properties of instances of Foo, because they are actually offsets of a single array called $array. –  BoltClock Jul 2 '11 at 7:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
$array['a'] = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
$array['b'] = array('1', '2', '3', '4');

this means the $array var was defined in the first line, in the second you only put stuff into it. That is why it won't work in a class, you cannot define the same variable twice.

Even more, the []= is a modifying operator, which can not be used in class definition, the same reason you can not use the ++ sign. Not a deep programming or computer inability to do that, just a design decision not to do logic outside of methods inside a class (As opposed to JS or Ruby for example).

Of course, all that behaviour can be changed by "small" C hacking of the engine ;-)

share|improve this answer

I don't know the technical reason why you can't do like you describe. Probably something silly and very low level. You could easily get around this, for a concrete class anyway, by setting the arrays in the constructor like this:

class foo {

protected $bar = new array();

  function __construct() {
    $array['a'] = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
    $array['b'] = array('1', '2', '3', '4');

    $this->bar = $array;
  }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
The technical reason is simply that that's the wrong place to modify an existing variable. The right place is in, as you say, the constructor. –  BoltClock Jul 2 '11 at 7:04

Don't know exact reason. Suppose php still has some kinks in its code.

class Foo {
    protected $array=array();
    public function Foo()
    {
    $array['b'] = array('1', '2', '3', '4');
    }
}

But this compiles ok. So you can just put the code in the constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
No, it doesn't. It's the expected behavior. –  BoltClock Jul 2 '11 at 7:09
    
The answer with the detailed explanation is upvoted. –  Daniel Iankov Jul 2 '11 at 7:15

Something wrong with

public function __construct() {
   $this->array['a'] = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
   $this->array['b'] = array('1', '2', '3', '4');
}

I can only postulate on the technical reasons for this. A guess is that [] is an operation in php which can change the size in memory of a variable. Class definitions should have a constant space in memory when initialized.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.