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I have two variables, x (takes in 5 values) and y (takes in 11 values). When I want to run the argument,

> v <- 2*x +y +1

R responds:

Error at 2* x+y: Longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length.

I tried: 1*x gives me 5 values of x, but y has 11 values. So R says it can’t add 11 to 5 values? – This raises the general question: Under what circumstances does recycling work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Recycling works in your example:

> x <- seq(5)
> y <- seq(11)
> x+y
 [1]  2  4  6  8 10  7  9 11 13 15 12
Warning message:
In x + y : longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length
> v <- 2*x +y +1 
Warning message:
In 2 * x + y :
  longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length
> v
 [1]  4  7 10 13 16  9 12 15 18 21 14

The "error" that you reported is in fact a "warning" which means that R is notifying you that it is recycling but recycles anyway. You may have options(warn=2) turned on, which converts warnings into error messages.

In general, avoid relying on recycling. If you get in the habit of ignoring the warnings, some day it will bite you and your code will fail in some very hard to diagnose way.

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Thank you; this was helpful. –  Rose Blasche Jul 3 '11 at 0:36

It doesn't work this way. You have to have vectors of the same length:

    x_samelen = c(1,2,3)
    y_samelen = c(10,20,30)
    x_samelen*y_samelen
    [1] 10 40 90

If vectors are of the same length, the result is well defined and understood. You can do "recycling", but it really is not advisable to do so.

I wrote a short script to make your two vectors of the same length, via padding the short vector. This will let you execute your code without warnings:

    x_orig <- c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11)
    y_orig <- c(21,22,23,24,25)

    if ( length(x_orig)>length(y_orig) ) {
        x <- x_orig
        y <- head(x = as.vector(t(rep(x=y_orig, times=ceiling(length(x_orig)/length(y_orig))))), n = length(x_orig) )   
        cat("padding y\r\n")
    } else {
        x <- head(x = as.vector(t(rep(x=x_orig, times=ceiling(length(y_orig)/length(x_orig))))), n = length(y_orig) )
        y <- y_orig
        cat("padding x\r\n")
    }

The results are:

    x_orig
     [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
    y_orig
    [1] 21 22 23 24 25
    x
     [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
    y
     [1] 21 22 23 24 25 21 22 23 24 25 21

If you reverse x_orig and y_orig:

    x_orig
    [1] 21 22 23 24 25
    y_orig
     [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
    x
     [1] 21 22 23 24 25 21 22 23 24 25 21
    y
     [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
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Tempted to give -1, but won't, since you're new to SO. Vector recycling is essential for some operations. x <- 1:3; x==3; [1] FALSE FALSE TRUE is an example. I really don't see the point of your example. You have simply defined an explicit function to do exactly what vector replacement will do automatically. –  Andrie Jul 2 '11 at 9:22
    
@Andrie: It's generally a not good idea to create code that generates warnings, is it? With my short code you avoid that. But you cite the wrong example. Your example should be x <- 1:3; x == c(2,3) That causes the warning longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length –  JSawyer Jul 2 '11 at 10:24
    
@JSawyer: if you want the result but not the warnings why not just suppressWarnings(x==c(2,3)) ? –  Ben Bolker Jul 2 '11 at 11:42
    
@JSawyer The point of my example is that vector recycling is implicitly used - without error or warning. So the example illustrates where vector recycling is essential to make R behave in the way you expect it to. @BenBolker has shown the 'correct' way of dealing with those warnings you can live with (where correct means I use it in the same way). –  Andrie Jul 2 '11 at 12:07
1  
@Ben: another solution to get two (or more) vectors of the same length is to suppress warnings just for samelen <- cbind(x,y), if you don't want to use the if block from my answer for performance reasons. –  JSawyer Jul 3 '11 at 11:46

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