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So far I'm doing it this way:

SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE column in(var1,var2,var3) or column is NULL

I have issues with repeating column name two times here since in() can't take null as an argument, it returns also no error, just 0 columns. (Maybe some magic variables that can refer last called column ?)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This:

'column'

is a string literal, not a column name. So this:

'column' in(var1,var2,var3) or 'column' is NULL

won't match anything unless var1, var2, or var3 happen to be the string 'column'. Try dropping the quotes on the column name:

SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE column in (var1, var2, var3) or column is NULL
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of course, you are right with quotes, but that doesn't answer my question, I need a way to rewrite this query so column name is referenced only once –  rsk82 Jul 2 '11 at 8:05
    
@user393087: Why would you need to do such a thing? Since NULL = x is false for all x you won't be able to do it, handling NULL almost always require a special case. Perhaps you should include a real query along with a schema and some sample data to clarify what your problem is. –  mu is too short Jul 2 '11 at 8:11
    
I need to write function that converts array into a string with in() that is added then at the end of a query and it would be good if that function could be column name agnostic. –  rsk82 Jul 2 '11 at 8:34
1  
@user393087: You can't, NULL has to be treated specially all the time. You could say COALESCE(column, '') IN ('this','that','other','') to use an empty string instead of NULL but then you can't just tack something onto the end of an existing query. Your function needs to take the column name as an argument so that you can tack on the column IS NULL bit if necessary. –  mu is too short Jul 2 '11 at 8:42
1  
@user393087: You commented while I was writing mine. But using COALESCE means that your function needs to know the column name so that it can write that whole part of the WHERE clause and if you're doing that you should just use IS NULL and save yourself the trouble of using a sentinel value as a kludge. –  mu is too short Jul 2 '11 at 8:45

Another option without repeating column name:

SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE coalesce(column,'NULL') in (var1,var2,var3,'NULL')
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You could do a union select:

SELECT 
  * 
FROM 
  `table_name` 
WHERE 
  `column` IN (var1, var2, var3)
UNION
  SELECT
    *
  FROM
    `table_name`
  WHERE
    `column` IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
this also repeats column name two times, of course ideal would be select * from table where column in(1,2,3,null) - but therre is a bug with null and in() in sqlite3 –  rsk82 Jul 2 '11 at 8:10
    
No, it does not repeat the column name. This will only repeat the column name if YOU have repeated it in your SELECT. –  Juventus18 Jul 5 '11 at 22:21

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