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struct Test
{
        template <class T>
        void print(T& t)
    {
        t.print();
    }
};

struct A
{
    void print() {printf( "A");}
};

struct B
{
    void print() {printf( "B");}
};

void test_it()
{   
    A a;
    B b;

    Test t;
    t.print(a);
    t.print(b);
}

This compiles fine.

struct Test
{
        template <class T>
        void print(T& t)
    {
        t.print();
    }
};


void test_it()
{   
    struct A
    {
        void print() {printf( "A");}
    };

    struct B
    {
        void print() {printf( "B");}
    };

    A a;
    B b;

    Test t;
    t.print(a);
    t.print(b);
}

This fails with error : no matching function for call to 'Test::print(test_it()::A&)'

Can anyone explain me why this happen ? Thanks!!!

share|improve this question
    
not 100% sure, but might be because Test is in the global scope an hence cannot possibly 'see' A and B which are function local –  stijn Jul 2 '11 at 8:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In your second example, A and B are local types, which can't be used as template type arguments in C++03 as per §14.3.1/2:

A local type, a type with no linkage, an unnamed type or a type compounded from any of these types shall not be used as a template-argument for a template type-parameter.

share|improve this answer
3  
@Alexander K.: Note that C++0x lifts this restriction. gcc-4.6.0 -std=c++0x compiles the second example just fine. –  n.m. Jul 2 '11 at 8:18
    
+1 confirms what I expected but in 'standard' lingo :] –  stijn Jul 2 '11 at 8:18
    
Thanks a lot for the info. –  Alexander K. Jul 2 '11 at 9:46

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