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if 1st column detect 1, then add  1 -1 -1 to 2nd to 4th column 
if 1st column detect 2, then add -1  1 -1 to 2nd to 4th column 
if 1st column detect 3, then add -1 -1  1 to 2nd to 4th column 

example: A is 5x1 matrix

A=
1
2
3
2
1

i would like to get the result as below: A become 5x4 matrix

A =
1  1 -1 -1
2 -1  1 -1
3 -1 -1  1
2 -1  1 -1
1  1 -1 -1

the code i wrote below can not get the above result, please help...

if A(1:end,1) == 1
   A(1:end,2:4) = [1 -1 -1]
else if A(1:end,1) == 2
   A(1:end,2:4) = [-1 1 -1]
else 
   A(1:end,2:4) = [-1 -1 1]
end
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What problem? What is your question? –  Mr E Jul 2 '11 at 8:12
    
i can not get the result by using the code i wrote above..how can i get the result as above mention? –  weird Jul 2 '11 at 9:18
    
I fixed your formatting. Do you agree with that? (If not, please just revert it). But, more seriously, you do have some answers already. Would it be possible to give them some constructive feedback? Thanks –  eat Jul 2 '11 at 18:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Firstly, you're comparing integers to vectors in your if statements. That won't work. You need to loop over the entire vector, checking each element by itself. It is also preferable to preallocate the result matrix before modifying it, as allocation is an expensive operation:

A = [A zeros(size(A,1), 3)];
for i=1:size(A,1)
    if(A(i,1) == 1)
        A(i,2:4) = [1 -1 -1];
    elseif(A(i,1) == 2)
        A(i,2:4) = [-1 1 -1];
    elseif(A(i,1) == 3)
        A(i,2:4) = [-1 -1 1];
    end
end
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You can simply use indexing:

V = [
  1 -1 -1    %# rule 1
 -1  1 -1    %# rule 2
 -1 -1  1    %# rule 3
];

A = [1;2;3;2;1];

newA = [A V(A,:)];

The result:

newA =
     1     1    -1    -1
     2    -1     1    -1
     3    -1    -1     1
     2    -1     1    -1
     1     1    -1    -1
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2  
This is way more elegant than my solution, and really the "proper" way to do this in MATLAB. –  You Jul 6 '11 at 16:23

This should give you an idea

>>> A= [1 2 3 2 1; zeros(3, 5)]';
>>> m= 1== A(:, 1); A(m, 2: 4)= repmat([ 1 -1 -1], sum(m), 1);
>>> m= 2== A(:, 1); A(m, 2: 4)= repmat([-1  1 -1], sum(m), 1);
>>> m= 3== A(:, 1); A(m, 2: 4)= repmat([-1 -1  1], sum(m), 1);
>>> A
A =
   1   1  -1  -1
   2  -1   1  -1
   3  -1  -1   1
   2  -1   1  -1
   1   1  -1  -1

how to, quite straightforward manner, encapsulate this kind of functionality in to your code.

For example like

>>> A= [1 2 3 2 1; zeros(3, 5)]';
>>> I= [1 -1 -1; -1 1 -1; -1 -1 1];
>>> for k= 1: size(I, 1)
  >    m= k== A(:, 1); A(m, 2: 4)= repmat(I(k, :), sum(m), 1);
  > end

Or even more compactly, like

>>> A= [1 2 3 2 1; zeros(3, 5)]';
>>> I= [1 -1 -1; -1 1 -1; -1 -1 1];
>>> A= [A(:, 1) I(A(:, 1), :)]
A =
   1   1  -1  -1
   2  -1   1  -1
   3  -1  -1   1
   2  -1   1  -1
   1   1  -1  -1

Which indeed suggest, that many Matlab operations, apparently needing the repmat, can actually be handled with some 'clever' indexing scheme.

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