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I am asking for input from a functions using fgets. I keep getting a annoying bug, in which the program skips right over the input and goes to input of the second variable. I have no idea what seems to be the problem. The code in question is below. It reads from getchar(), and if it is 'n' it goes the 2nd function.

#include <stdio.h>

void enter(){
    char name[20];

int Age;
float Highbp;
float Lowbp;

    printf("name: ");
    fgets(name, 20, stdin);

    printf("age: ");
    scanf("%d", &Age);

    printf("high bp: ");
    scanf("%f", &Highbp);

    printf("low bp: ");
scanf("%f", &Lowbp);


    return ;

    }
    void option(){

        char choice = getchar();

        if(choice == 'n'){

        enter();
        }
    }
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

option();
}

output produced (not the whole output):

>n
>name: age: 

This works now

printf("name: ");
while(getchar()!='\n');

fgets(name, 20, stdin);
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's because the stdin buffer has a newline buffered in it. To remove it, use :

fflush(stdin);

So your code is now like this:

#include <stdio.h>

void enter(){
char name[20];

int Age;
float Highbp;
float Lowbp;

printf("name: ");
fflush(stdin);
fgets(name, 20, stdin);

printf("age: ");
scanf("%d", &Age);

printf("high bp: ");
scanf("%f", &Highbp);

printf("low bp: ");
scanf("%f", &Lowbp);


return ;

}
void option(){

    char choice = getchar();

    if(choice == 'n'){

    enter();
    }
}
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

option();
}

Edited

Since, everybody here says that it is discouraged to use fflush(stdin); (Although it had worked for me everytime. :) ) Here is another solution. Instead of fflush(stdin) use:

while(getchar()!='\n');

That will empty the buffer for the newline that may skip next fgets call.

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Flushing stdin is non-standard and discouraged! There's a good chance it won't work (actually, it shouldn't work). –  cnicutar Jul 2 '11 at 8:32
    
but the idea is right, i.e. find a way to get rid of the newline still kept in stdin. Maybe with something like while( getchar() != EOF ) ; just after the first getchar and before the next stdin readings; it will consume all the already given input. –  ShinTakezou Jul 2 '11 at 8:53
    
@ShinTakezou No, discarding output like that is dangerous. See the links in my answer. –  cnicutar Jul 2 '11 at 10:50
    
agree with the wrong usage of fflush on sstdin, I meant the idea is good (to "flush" the input), the way was wrong; or do you meant consuming input until there's input is dangerous? it is, if the input is an endless stream, the the loop lasts forever... but this is not the case (hopefully), ... –  ShinTakezou Jul 2 '11 at 12:31
1  
This answer is wrong. Calling fflush(stdin) invokes undefined behavior. "It has worked everytime for me" does not indicate that something is correct. –  R.. Jul 2 '11 at 14:10
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I didn't run your code so I can only guess. This sounds familiar:

the program skips right over the input and goes to input of the second variable.

It is related to these questions:

The input stream after the first scanf call still contains a \n, so the gets call reads it right away, without pausing for you to enter anything more. The problem is that the gets call satisfies its need for input in an unexpected way

So it's probably some leftover \n somewhere.

EDIT

I re-read your code and I believe your problem is:

char choice = getchar(); /* leaves a \n in the buffer */
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