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I've read and searched and I'm yet to figure out an answer to this relatively simple issue.

I have a class:

public class AccessibleTreeItem
{
    public string name;
    public List<AccessibleTreeItem> children;

    public AccessibleTreeItem()
    {
        children = new List<AccessibleTreeItem>();
    }
}

which is populate using a series of functions that don't really matter in this context, but what I'm looking for is a way to search through ALL of the children items in the list, searching for a particular 'name' value, and if found, returning that List.

How is this achieved in the easiest manner, with the least performance hit? Thanks - I've been stumped at this point for days now...

share|improve this question
    
Do you want a List or an Item returned? –  Henk Holterman Jul 2 '11 at 9:38
    
It would be an Item. There should only be one result returned....and now that I think about it, maybe it should be a list. I can always check how many items are in it. –  HeWhoWas Jul 2 '11 at 9:46
    
But a finding list of all items is much more expensive than finding only the first. –  Henk Holterman Jul 2 '11 at 9:55
    
Then I can live without as well :-) I can always modify code that works (When it does) to take into consideration other properties if name isn't unique enough. –  HeWhoWas Jul 2 '11 at 10:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted
public class AccessibleTreeItem
{
    public string name;
    public List<AccessibleTreeItem> children;

    public AccessibleTreeItem()
    {
        children = new List<AccessibleTreeItem>();
    }

    public static AccessibleTreeItem Find(AccessibleTreeItem node, string name)
    {

        if (node == null)
            return null;

        if (node.name == name)
            return node;

        foreach (var child in node.children)
        {
            var found = Find(child, name);
            if (found != null)
                return found;
        }

        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Right, but this is a Depth-first search. It might be more efficient to check all Children before recursing. –  Henk Holterman Jul 2 '11 at 9:45
    
So you are saying DFS is less efficient, than BFS... Hm, no - they are exactly the same - both traverse by visiting each node only once. If you don't want to have recursion, you can do both BFS and DFS iteratively. –  Petar Ivanov Jul 2 '11 at 9:50
    
I've tested the code, and for some reason it always returns null? I set breakpoints and checked the AccessibleTreeItem node manually - the child object is there, but it's nested within 4 levels. Does the fact that there are an unlimited number of nestings change the way this would need to work? –  HeWhoWas Jul 2 '11 at 9:59
    
Yes. Passing the root to the function, and when manually walking the lists I find what I'm looking for at node.children[0].children[1].children[1].children[0] –  HeWhoWas Jul 2 '11 at 10:02
    
Sorry, you're right, it does work. A spelling error tripped me up :-P Serves me right for using 2 variables of such similar names. It works perfectly, thank you for the help :-) –  HeWhoWas Jul 2 '11 at 10:05

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