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I would like the number of (potentially fractional) calendar months between two days e.g. 2 Jan 2013 - 15 Feb 2014 should be around 12.5 months.

I was surprised not to find this already answered on Google.

EDIT: I ended up writing some code - here's my answer if anybody needs the same (my Good Karma for the day :)

/// <summary>
/// Number of total calendar months between two dates. If day of month is different,
/// gives fractional approximation using average days per month.
/// </summary>
public static double MonthsBetween(DateTime start, DateTime finish)
{
    //handle if dates switched - calculation same but there's a negative result:
    double multiplier;
    if(finish < start)
    {
        var temp = start;
        start = finish;
        finish = temp;
        multiplier = -1;
    }
    else
    {
        multiplier = 1;
    }

    //1) 20 Mar 2012 - 13 Jan 2014 --> 2*12 months
    //2) 15 Jan 2011 - 30 Jul 2012 --> 1*12 months
    //3) 20 Jan 2010 - 25 Jan 2010 --> 0*12 months
    double totalMonths = (finish.Year - start.Year)*12;

    //1) 20 Mar 2012 - 13 Jan 2014 --> 2*12 + 1 - 3 = 22 months
    //2) 15 Jan 2011 - 30 Jul 2012 --> 1*12 + 7 - 1 = 18 months
    //3) 20 Jan 2010 - 25 Jan 2010 --> 0*12 + 0 months = 0 months
    totalMonths += finish.Month - start.Month;

    ///Now we have "1st of the month to 1st of the month" difference. Days can only be approximated,
    ///since each month has a different number of days. Statistically (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Month#Julian_and_Gregorian_calendars):
    const double averageDaysInMonth = 30.436875;

    ///Remove the days we've included in the starting month (not in actual period):
    totalMonths -= start.Day / averageDaysInMonth;

    ///Add the days in the finish month (weren't yet included, since had "1st to 1st"):
    totalMonths += finish.Day / averageDaysInMonth;

    //1) 20 Mar 2012 - 13 Jan 2014 --> 2*12 + 1 - 3 - 20/30 + 13/30 = 22 - 7/30 = 21.76 months
    //2) 15 Jan 2011 - 30 Jul 2012 --> 1*12 + 7 - 1 - 15/30 + 30/30 = 18 + 15/30 = 18.5 months
    //3) 20 Jan 2010 - 25 Jan 2010 --> 0*12 + 0 - 20/30 + 25/30 = 0 + 5/30 = 0.17 months

    return totalMonths * multiplier;
}

Likewise, I realised just after I need something similar for years. Here's that code too, in case it helps somebody:

/// <summary>
/// Number of total calendar years between two dates. Gives fractional 
/// approximation if months/days differ.
/// </summary>
public static double YearsBetween(DateTime start, DateTime finish)
{
    //handle if dates switched - calculation same but there's a negative result:
    double multiplier;
    if (finish < start)
    {
        var temp = start;
        start = finish;
        finish = temp;
        multiplier = -1;
    }
    else
    {
        multiplier = 1;
    }

    //1) 20 Mar 2012 - 13 Jan 2014 --> 2 years
    //2) 15 Jan 2011 - 30 Jul 2012 --> 1 year
    //3) 20 Jan 2010 - 25 Jan 2010 --> 0 years
    double totalYears = finish.Year - start.Year;

    ///Now we have "1st of the year to 1st of the year" difference. Days/months can only be approximated,
    ///since each year has a different number of days. Statistically (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year):
    const double averageDaysPerYear = 365.2425;

    ///Remove the days we've included in the starting year (not in actual period):
    totalYears -= start.DayOfYear / averageDaysPerYear;

    ///Add the days in the finish year (weren't yet included, since had "Jan 1 to Jan 1"):
    totalYears += finish.DayOfYear / averageDaysPerYear;

    //1) 20 Mar 2012 - 13 Jan 2014 --> 2 - ~(2*30+20)/365 + 13/365 = 1.82 years
    //2) 15 Jan 2011 - 30 Jul 2012 --> 1 - 15/365 + ~(6*30+30)/365 = 1.53 years
    //3) 20 Jan 2010 - 25 Jan 2010 --> 0 - 20/365 + 25/365 = 0.01 years

    return totalYears * multiplier;
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is a definition of '0.5 of the month'? How may days is it? –  Jakub Konecki Jul 2 '11 at 9:51
    
0.5 is good enough for my purposes. I only need a reasonable and consistent fraction in the case of non-round numbers. –  alpsystems.com Jul 2 '11 at 10:06
4  
The notion of charging fractional months must spring from the mind of somebody that likes dealing with never-ending billing disputes. A lawyer perhaps? –  Hans Passant Jul 2 '11 at 11:20
    
Eeeep. Replace those comments with tests... –  Ritch Melton Jul 2 '11 at 12:32

5 Answers 5

Use the following:

TimeSpan timeSpan = laterDate.Subtract(earlierDate);
var monthsCount = timeSpan.TotalDays / MonthDaysCount;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks much, but see my comment about ChrisBint above... does your code satisfy that concern? –  alpsystems.com Jul 2 '11 at 10:09

Probably best option to use an assumption;

var startTime = Convert.ToDateTime("02/01/2013");
var endTime = Convert.ToDateTime("15/02/2014");
var span = endTime.Subtract(startTime);

Console.WriteLine("Time Difference (months): " + Math.Round((decimal)span.Days/30,1));

Gives 13.6

share|improve this answer
    
In my case I need an answer of exactly 1.0000 for e.g. 1 February to 1 March. Imagine you are billing your clients $10/month and are using this formula to figure out how much to charge them - if they get a bill of $9.99 you just lost a penny for no reason, and I HATE losing money for no reason! :-) –  alpsystems.com Jul 2 '11 at 10:08
    
If you are billing clients on a monthly basis @ £x per month, then not sure why you are trying to calculate it like this. Just .AddMonth(1) to a date; msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.addmonths.aspx –  ChrisBint Jul 2 '11 at 10:11
    
Also, just to add, 1 Feb to 1st March is not 1 month, it is 1 month + 1 day. 1st Feb to 28th Feb is 1 month. –  ChrisBint Jul 2 '11 at 10:19
    
Hey Chris, thanks for the feedback. Specially, I have a "last billed date" e.g. 1 March 2011. And a "bill TO (not THRU) date" e.g. 1 May 2011. So the answer should be 2 months in this case. The number of days in those months is irrelevent, since I've priced in "months" and obviously billing for what seems like a strange fraction will wreck havoc! –  alpsystems.com Jul 2 '11 at 10:28
    
If your billing is centred around months, then I still have no idea why you needed to calculate to a fraction similiar to 12.5 months. But hey, if you can get it to work, then great. –  ChrisBint Jul 2 '11 at 10:39

If you're willing to use a 30 day month, try this:

DateTime date1 = new DateTime(2013, 1, 2);
DateTime date2 = new DateTime(2014, 2, 15);

TimeSpan difference = date2.Subtract(date1);

double elapsedMonths = difference.TotalDays / 30;
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I don't think I can assume a 30 day month - see comment as for ChrisBint above. But thank you anyway! –  alpsystems.com Jul 2 '11 at 10:10

If you really want fractional months then one way would be to take the number of days and divide by the (approximate) average number of days in a month.

e.g.

(new DateTime(2013, 1, 2) - new DateTime(2014, 2, 15)).TotalDays / (365.25 / 12)

Which gives the result -13.4373716632444. This can be rounded to the precision you require, e.g. 13.5 (I believe the 12.5 in your question should read 13.5).

The approximation here is the average number of days in a month, 365.25 / 12. This should work for all but extremely large date ranges.

EDIT

However, it's important to note that this is all an approximation - calendar months are an inconsistent measure (the number of days vary) so that half of one month does not necessarily equal half of another month.

Given this, it would be far easier to either a) charge per calender month and have a policy in place where you charge for a given month if a service is provided for 15 days or more, or b) charge by day. If you really want to go down to 'half month' level then you need to decide when a standard 'half' month has elapsed, e.g. 15 days, but this gets complicated when deciding when the next 'half' month should be charged for.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks much, but see my comment about ChrisBint above... does your code satisfy that concern? –  alpsystems.com Jul 2 '11 at 10:09
    
well, at some point you have to decide what your rounding level is and how to apply it. are you going to charge for whole months or half months? are you going to round to nearest or always round down or always round up? You imply that you want to charge for half months only, but this is always going to be an approximate figure, since number of days per month is not exactly 365.25 / 12 (but it is very close). If using nearest rounding then sometimes the result will be 0.249999999999999 rounded to zero and sometimes it will be 0.250000000000001 rounded to 0.5. You need to decide your policy. –  Adam Ralph Jul 2 '11 at 10:22

If you charge monthly than just do Math.Floor and don't charge for those extra few days. Your customers will be happily surprised and may even come back (or at least tell some other potential customers).

Also, the amount of time you've already waisted on solving this problem is probably less then the amount of money you will loose...

share|improve this answer
    
Nice thought - I'll have a think, see if maybe the answer is to drop fractional and handle that those admittedly rare exceptions manually. They do come up fairly regularly though, when 1) a customer wants to adjust their monthly billing day - no way I want to give them a freebie in that case, since typically it's a way for them to actively TRY for a few free days when their invoice goes overdue 2) new customers - my monthly subscription is sometimes as high as $300/month so if it's 15 days, that's quite a big freebie... –  alpsystems.com Jul 2 '11 at 18:36
    
I'm using a similar business model and think that giving a customer $150 off is the best advertising money can buy. This customer will tell all their friends about it and you will get more attention than spending it on AdWords. What is more, I can bet your costs are pretty much constant so it doesn't cost you more to keep this single customer for 15 days. I'll give you an example of FogBugz - their promise is: If you’re not satisfied, for any reason, within 90 days you get a full refund, period, no questions asked. We don’t want your money if you’re not amazingly happy –  Jakub Konecki Jul 2 '11 at 18:45

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