Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to get all the tables a table depends on? There must be as SQL Server Management Studio allows you to do this by selecting Find Dependencies and then the option 'Object which [tablename] depends on'

I know about sp_depends but this give me back the object that depend on the table not what the table depends on.

Thanks in advance,

Jon

share|improve this question
1  
You can be really sneaky by turning on SQL Profiler and capturing the queries Management Studio runs -- in Profiler, be sure to disable the column filter that removes Management Studio queries. –  Jon Seigel Jul 3 '11 at 2:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the discussion with gbn and the assumption that you only care about the objects the table depends on (rather than anything that depends on the table), I came up with this contrived example:

USE [master];
GO

IF DB_ID('foo') IS NOT NULL
    DROP DATABASE foo;
GO

CREATE DATABASE foo;
GO

USE foo;
GO

CREATE TYPE dbo.Email FROM VARCHAR(320) NOT NULL;
GO

CREATE SCHEMA foo AUTHORIZATION dbo;
GO

CREATE TYPE foo.Email FROM VARCHAR(320) NULL;
GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.IsGreaterThanZero1(@i INT)
RETURNS BIT
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN (SELECT CASE WHEN @i>0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END);
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.IsGreaterThanZero2(@i INT)
RETURNS BIT
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN (SELECT CASE WHEN @i>0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END);
END
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.bar
(
    id INT PRIMARY KEY
);
GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.maxbar()
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN (SELECT MAX(id) FROM dbo.bar);
END
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.foo
(
    id INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES dbo.bar(id), 
        -- dependency on foreign key to another table
    Email1 dbo.Email, 
        -- dependency on alias type
    Email2 foo.Email, 
        -- dependency on alias type in different schema
    IsMoreThanZero1 AS CONVERT(BIT, dbo.IsGreaterThanZero1(id)), 
        -- computed column dependency
    IsMoreThanZero1A AS dbo.IsGreaterThanZero1(id), 
        -- computed column dependency
    IsMoreThanZero2 BIT CHECK (dbo.IsGreaterThanZero2(IsMoreThanZero2)=1), 
        -- check constraint dependency
    IsMoreThanZero2A BIT CHECK (CONVERT(BIT,     
            dbo.IsGreaterThanZero2(IsMoreThanZero2A))=1), 
        CHECK(IsMoreThanZero2A LIKE '[,%]'),
        -- check constraint dependency
    maxbar INT NOT NULL DEFAULT (dbo.maxbar()) 
        -- default constraint dependency
);
GO

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.after_insert_foo ON dbo.foo
FOR INSERT
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE @x INT;
    SELECT TOP (1) @x = id FROM dbo.bar;
END
GO

Okay, now that the database is chock full of stuff to find, the following script will identify all of the object references above:

DECLARE @tablename SYSNAME = N'dbo.foo';

DECLARE @object_id INT = OBJECT_ID(@tablename);

-- functions mentioned in check/default constraints
-- and computed columns in @tablename

WITH x AS 
(
    SELECT [type], [obj], [count] = COUNT(*)
    FROM
    (
        SELECT [type], obj = OBJECT_ID( 
            SUBSTRING(d, CHARINDEX('],', d) + 2, 
                CHARINDEX('(', SUBSTRING(d, 
                CHARINDEX('],', d) + 2, LEN(d)))-1))
        FROM
        (
            SELECT [type] = 'default', [object_id], d = [definition]
            FROM sys.default_constraints 
            WHERE parent_object_id = @object_id
            AND CHARINDEX('].[', [definition]) > 0 
            UNION
            SELECT 'check', [object_id], [definition]
            FROM sys.check_constraints
            WHERE parent_object_id = @object_id
            AND CHARINDEX('].[', [definition]) > 0 
            UNION
            SELECT 'computed', NULL, [definition]
            FROM sys.computed_columns
            WHERE [object_id] = @object_id 
            AND CHARINDEX('].[', [definition]) > 0 
        ) AS x
    ) AS y GROUP BY [type], [obj]

    UNION ALL

    -- triggers defined on @tablename
    SELECT 'trigger', obj = [object_id], 1
        FROM sys.triggers
        WHERE parent_id = @object_id

    UNION ALL

    -- objects referenced by triggers on @tablename
    SELECT 'trigger references', [obj] = d.[referenced_major_id], COUNT(*)
        FROM sys.sql_dependencies AS d
        INNER JOIN sys.triggers AS tr
        ON d.[object_id] = tr.[object_id]
        AND tr.parent_id = @object_id
        GROUP BY d.referenced_major_id

    UNION ALL

    -- foreign keys referenced by @tablename
    SELECT 'foreign key', [obj] = referenced_object_id, COUNT(*)
        FROM sys.foreign_keys
        WHERE parent_object_id = @object_id
        GROUP BY referenced_object_id
)
SELECT 
    [obj] = QUOTENAME(OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(obj)) + '.'
          + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_NAME(obj)), 
    [type],
    [count]
FROM x
UNION ALL
SELECT
    [obj],
    [type],
    [count] = COUNT(*)
FROM
(
    SELECT
        [obj] = QUOTENAME(SCHEMA_NAME(t.[schema_id])) 
            + '.' + QUOTENAME(t.name),
        [type] = 'alias type'
    FROM
        sys.types AS t
        INNER JOIN sys.columns AS c
        ON t.user_type_id = c.user_type_id
        WHERE t.is_user_defined = 1
        AND c.[object_id] = @object_id
) AS x GROUP BY [obj], [type];

There are more caveats here than I care to mention. One is that the definition parsing in sys.default_constraints, sys.check_constraints and sys.computed_columns assumes that you don't have constants that look amazingly like object names (specifically I parse for ].[ to show a function name, since you can't leave the schema out and square brackets are added for you), function names that don't include special characters like "[", ".", or "]", or have arguments passed to the UDF that contain '[' or ']' because I use those to determine that it is in fact a function (and I also assume that there aren't nested functions). It also assumes that all references are contained within the same database. Yet another is that I only go one layer deep - if you have a trigger on dbo.foo that calls a function that in turn references another table, that won't be included. Free help is only going to be willing to go so far down the rabbit hole. :-)

I still don't trust any of the dependencies views 100%, so if your system is volatile I would say your safest bet is to follow gbn's advice and pursue brute force parsing using sys.sql_modules.definition for the parts of this that are prone to invalidation due to schema changes. There are just so many ways that automating this stuff can go wrong, I don't know if you'll ever have a 100% bullet-proof solution - though with a LOT of work you can get pretty close.

But back to the original question - maybe you could define explicitly exactly which types of dependencies you're looking for.

share|improve this answer

Tables don't normally depend on tables apart from

  • foreign keys. Use sys.foreign_key, object_id and referenced_object_id columns
  • triggers. Use sys.sql_modules and sys.objects.
  • CHECK constraints that have UDFs. Tricky one this, use sys.sql_modules and sys.objects again

Indirect dependencies, like what view JOINs 2 tables will all be from some clever queries on sys.sql_modules

share|improve this answer
    
Even that last one, the view depends on the tables, not the other way around. There are also alias types that might fall under the requirement. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 2 '11 at 13:16
    
@Aaron Bertrand: True, but if OP means "related" rather than "dependent" then it's still a clever query on sys.sql_modules. It's a messy requirement in any case. –  gbn Jul 2 '11 at 13:23
    
View -> table relationship should actually be pretty easy (sys.sql_dependencies). –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 2 '11 at 13:24
    
@Aaron Bertrand: Unless the view is schemabound, this is unreliable (for all cases). sys.sql_expression_dependencies is better. sys.sql_modules is more useful generally. –  gbn Jul 2 '11 at 13:26
    
For stored procedures I agree. Creating a view does not support deferred resolution for objects. Perhaps I'm not thinking straight because it's early, but the only case I can think of where this breaks is if you create a view then drop one of the referenced tables - even a rename doesn't break it, because it uses object_id - in which case, you won't have a table to start from anyway. Parsing sys.sql_modules won't account for post-compile drops or renames either. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 2 '11 at 13:32

Have you tried sp_MSdependencies? It's undocumented so you cannot completely rely on it, but it seems to be pretty flexible and to do its job nicely...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.