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I have some actions:

public partial class MyController : Controller
{    
     public ActionResult Action1()
     {              
     }
     public ActionResult Action2(int id)
     {              
     }

     public ActionResult Action3(string id)
     {              
     }

     public ActionResult Action4(string name)
     {              
     }
}

Do I need register routes for each action like this:

 routes.MapRoute("r1", "{controller}/{action}/{id}", new { id = UrlParameter.Optional });   
 routes.MapRoute("r2", "{controller}/{action}/{name}", new { name = UrlParameter.Optional }); 

Or there is some way to register one pattern route for all actions or maybe I need some kind of "hack"?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Similar urls should use similar routes. So in this case you have only a single url pattern which is /controller/action/someid. So simply use the default route:

routes.MapRoute(
    "Default",
    "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
);

and then update your actions:

public partial class MyController : Controller
{    
     public ActionResult Action1()
     {              
     }
     public ActionResult Action2(int id)
     {              
     }

     public ActionResult Action3(string id)
     {              
     }

     public ActionResult Action4(string name)
     {              
     }
}

As far as the last action is concerned the name parameter could be passed as query string. If you really insist on it being part of the path, you could rename it to id. It is better to pass arbitrary strings such as names as query string parameters and not as part of the url paths.

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You don't have to register these extra url parameters... If you make a form with 3 input controls and give them a name, then you make a action with the same names as the input controls. They will be magicaly filled in.

If you use strongly typed views, you can even pass models als input:

public class customer
{
    public int Id { get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set}
    public string LastName {get;set;}
}

In your controller:

public ActionResult UpdateCustomer(Customer customer)
{
    // Add update logic
}
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