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I'm quite new to C programming, used to only use C++ with the String class, but I'm wondering how I would go about doing a recursive replacement of a string with another string.

My code is like this, but it doesn't seem to work correctly and I cannot quite pin down where it fails. It works fine on one replacement, but more than one and it fails.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char *replace_str(char *str, char *orig, char *rep)
{
    int current_index = 0;
    static char buffer[10000];

    if (!strstr(str, orig))  // Is 'orig' even in 'str'?
    {
        return str;
    }

    while (1)
    {        
        char *p;

        if (!(p = strstr(str + current_index, orig)))  // Is 'orig' even in 'str'?
        {
            return buffer;
        }

        strncpy(buffer, str, p-str); // Copy characters from 'str' start to 'orig' st$
        buffer[p-str] = '\0';

        sprintf(buffer+(p-str), "%s%s", rep, p+strlen(orig));


        printf("%d -> %s\n", current_index, buffer);

        current_index = (p - str) + strlen(rep);

        str = buffer;
    }

    return buffer;
}

int main(void)
{
    puts(replace_str("hello world world", "world", "world2"));

    return 0;
}

With this example, it prints this:

 0 -> hello world2 world
12 -> hello world2 world22
hello world2 world22
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "fail"? It stops replacing or there's an error? –  Vache Jul 2 '11 at 14:04
3  
I'd say not "recursively" but "iteratively". Just loop until you cannot find the search string anymore. –  Kerrek SB Jul 2 '11 at 14:05
    
It fails because it doesn't replace correctly any more. Here is example output: 0 -> hello world2 world 12 -> hello world2 world22 hello world2 world22 –  Tom Leese Jul 2 '11 at 14:18
    
A static buffer in a recursive function raises warning flags to me. There's an unchecked upper limit on the length of string you can manage, and it means that all nested invocations of the function are using the same storage. It also means no thread safety. It isn't necessarily wrong; but it is a red flag to me. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 2 '11 at 16:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It could be not the best implementation, but here you find a stringReplace function that does the task.

About your code. First, it is better the caller supplies its dest buffer instead of having a static buffer into the function. Then, you do not check for buffer overflow.

Your

    strncpy(buffer, str, p-str); // Copy characters from 'str' start to 'orig' st$

will copy from A to A except in the first iteration. This is not good, the buffer shouldn't overlap. Use memmove instead.

But the whole idea is not clean since you update the same buffer you use as source to catch other occurrences.

At some point you overwrite the input (when str and buffer points to the same thing) loosing information since your replacing word is longer than the original to be replaced so you do not preserve the "original next character". (If you try with "work" instead of "world2", it should work)...

So your current_index should index the original string str (and you'll never do str = buffer), and you will append to your internal buffer the part you need (up to an occurence of "world" if found then append "world2", update current_index by the length of "world" and go on).

I would do (trying to keep you original idea, more or less)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char *replace_str(char *str, const char *orig, const char *rep)
{
    size_t buf_index = 0;
    static char buffer[10000];

    if (!strstr(str, orig))  // Is 'orig' even in 'str'?
    {
        return str;
    }

    buffer[0] = 0;
    for(;;)
    {        
        char *p;

        if (!(p = strstr(str, orig)))  
        {
           strcpy(buffer + buf_index, str);
           return buffer;
        }
        strncpy(buffer + buf_index, str, p - str);
        strcpy(buffer + buf_index + (p - str), rep);
        buf_index += (p-str) + strlen(rep);
        str = p + strlen(orig);
    }
    return buffer;
}

int main(void)
{
    puts(replace_str("hello world world world", "wor", "world2"));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for explaining. –  Tom Leese Jul 2 '11 at 15:38

The problem is str = buffer; . You are effectively changing the source pointer, and that screwing up your code.

Use the below code before the start of the while loop

 char bk[100]
 strcpy(bk,str);

and replace all str occurrences in the while loop with bk.It will work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It worked! –  Tom Leese Jul 2 '11 at 15:12

use this recursive function rplcStr (), it's coded as simple replace c++.

string rplcStr(string x, string y, string z){
// Done by Raafat Maurice in 29 Feb 2012
// this function will replace all string (y) found in string (x) by the string (z).
        if (x.find(y.c_str(),0) != -1 ) {
            return (rplcStr (x.substr(0,  x.find(y.c_str(),0) ) + z + x.substr( x.find(y.c_str(),0) + y.size()  ) ,y,z));
        }
        else {
            return (x);
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
the question is tagged C, not C++ –  MarcDefiant Oct 26 '12 at 6:41

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