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My application uses a Service to do some background stuff. I am using additional threads in the service to do some computation. For this purpose I create two threads every 5 to 10 seconds, which are running 5 to 10 seconds. But I don't know which thread-model I should use:

  1. AsyncTask:

    Pros:

    • easy to use
    • android specific
    • easy UI-interaction

    Cons:

    • Since I have to use API level 10, there is no ExecutorService with fixed thread pool to execute the AsyncTasks
  2. Normal Java Threads:

    Pros:

    • ExecutorService with fixed thread pool

    Cons:

    • Not so easy to handle, e.g. UI-interaction

Which model is better to use? Especially in concern of performance. Is there a heavy overhead when i am using AsyncTasks, and is the ExecutorService faster in reusing the threads than Android in creating new AsyncTasks?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Andrew Barber Aug 19 '14 at 14:13

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you look at the implementation of AsyncTask, you will see that it uses its own thread pool using "normal Java threads".

Is there a heavy overhead when i am using AsyncTasks, and is the ExecutorService faster in reusing the threads than Android in creating new AsyncTasks?

There should be no substantial difference between the two.

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That is correct, thanks! –  Tobias Jul 2 '11 at 19:59

I'm using Needle; an open-source, simple and powerful multithreading library for Android. With it you can say things like:

Needle.onMainThread().execute(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // e.g. change one of the views
    }
});

or

Needle.onBackgroundThread().execute(new UiRelatedTask<Integer>() {
    @Override
    protected Integer doWork() {
        int result = 1+2;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    protected void thenDoUiRelatedWork(Integer result) {
        mSomeTextView.setText("result: " + result);
    }
});

Pros

  • very simple API
  • fixed thread pool size
  • customizable thread pool size
  • supports UI interaction ("do work and then use result on UI thread")
  • android 1.5+
  • behaves the same on all platform versions

Cons

  • extra library dependency

Check it out on GitHub: https://github.com/ZsoltSafrany/needle

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1  
This looks promising. Will give it a try on my next project. –  Tiago Sep 24 '14 at 2:54

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