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When comes to bridge method, i do know that java compiler will add them if there's a need so that overriding can be done properly by the subclass (after reading SCJP by mughal and angelikalanger website). But this is a bit confusing as per below:

Before erasure:

class x <T> {  
   void set(T t){}  
}

class y <E> extends x {  
   void set(E e) {} // name clash here  
}

class z<E> extends x {  
   void set(Object y) {} // no name clash here  
}

class z1<E> extends x<T> {  
   void set(Object y) {} // name clash here  
}

after erasure:

class x {  
   void set (Object t) {}  
}

I understand the name clash for class y but why there is no name clash for class z? Also there is a name clash for class z1? Puzzling

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class z overrides set method of class x. Type E and T are not strictly same type. so is name clash in class z1 –  Prince John Wesley Jul 2 '11 at 14:34
    
Just a recommendation: Don't use raw types, specially not for extending from them. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 2 '11 at 15:51
    
Received your flag, sorry - can't do as requested. –  Tim Post Jul 24 '11 at 7:42

2 Answers 2

class y <E> extends x {  
   void set(E e) {} // name clash here  
}

Here name clash occurs because E is not a subclass of T. So you cannot override the set method this way.see the explanation for z1 to understand better. For class y to work, you must have

class y <E> extends x<E> {  
   void set(E e) {}  
}

Next:

class z<E> extends x {  
   void set(Object y) {} // no name clash here  
}

Here there is no name clash because in the class X, set method gets interpreted as

void set(java.lang.Object) 

and in class z also the parameter of set is java.lang.Object.so no clash.

Next:

class z1<E> extends x<T> {  
   void set(Object y) {} // name clash here  
}

Again here name clash occurs because you have to have as parameter of set whatever type parameter you give to x. here, you pass to x type parameter T, but you have parameter of set method as java.lang.Object. hence name clash.

For z to work you must have:

class z1<E> extends x<Object> {  
       void set(Object y) {}  
}
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Lets talk about class y and class z. Since both has type parameter <E> and <E> is not the subtype of type parameter <T> in class x and for class y after erasure has the same method signature as class z, i don't see the difference between class y and class z. So why the name clash on class y and not on class z? – yapkm01 5 mins ago –  yapkm01 Jul 2 '11 at 15:56
    
Look, since you are overriding the method set, therefore it must follow some rules. y and z both have type parameter<E>. That doesn't matter here, because the problem is not that. the problem is strictly because of the parameter type of the set method. in x's set method you have the following: void set(T t){} right? Now every subclass that attempts to override this set method, must have a parameter which is either of type T or a superclass of T, such that it can refer to objects of type T passed to it. now in class z, parameter is Object, which can refer to any type, and also T. –  aps Jul 2 '11 at 16:06
    
One more thing: Don't confuse yourself by thinking about what happens after erasure. Doesn't matter what happens after erasure. Just think in terms of constraints imposed and generics will become easier. –  aps Jul 2 '11 at 16:13
    
Thanks. I'm still confused. Maybe it'll take sometime to sink in. My point is after erasure, class y has the same set method signature (set(Object y)) as class z. So to me, both these methods on class y and class z looks the same. There's where i'm so confused .. :O( –  yapkm01 Jul 2 '11 at 16:36
    
what happens after erasure doesn't matter really. Bridge methods doesn't mean that you can override a method any way you want. Don't code keeping erasure in mind. just forget all about erasure and think in terms of just generics.follow the rules of generics and you will be fine. Generic code needed to be compatible with non-generic code.So erasure was introduced. erasure gave rise to certain problems of difference between subclass and superclass.so bridge methods were introduced.you don't have to think about all that to write programs.just keep constraints introduced by generics in mind. –  aps Jul 2 '11 at 17:21

As you say, after erasure the set method takes an Object. z extends the non-generic, after erasure x

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