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I am trying to figure out how to convert an NSInteger, say 56, to an NSString that is a binary representation of the original (int) value. Perhaps someone knows a formatting technique that can accept 56 and return "111000" within Objective C. Thanks All.

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3 Answers

There's no built-in formatting operator to do that. If you wanted to convert it to a hexadecimal string, you could do:

NSString *str = [NSString stringWithFormat:"%x", theNumber];

To convert it to a binary string, you'll have to build it yourself:

NSMutableString *str = @"";
for(NSInteger numberCopy = theNumber; numberCopy > 0; numberCopy >>= 1)
{
    // Prepend "0" or "1", depending on the bit
    [str insertString:((numberCopy & 1) ? @"1" : @"0") atIndex:0];
}
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You get one of those yellow errors if you don't do NSMutableString *str = [NSMutableString stringWithFormat:@""]; –  Ethen A. Wilson Oct 9 '13 at 21:59
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NSString * binaryStringFromInteger( int number )
{
    NSMutableString * string = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];

    int spacing = pow( 2, 3 );
    int width = ( sizeof( number ) ) * spacing;
    int binaryDigit = 0;
    int integer = number;

    while( binaryDigit < width )
    {
        binaryDigit++;

        [string insertString:( (integer & 1) ? @"1" : @"0" )atIndex:0];

        if( binaryDigit % spacing == 0 && binaryDigit != width )
        {
            [string insertString:@" " atIndex:0];
        }

        integer = integer >> 1;
    }

    return string;
}

I started from Adam Rosenfield's version, and modified to:

  • add spaces between bytes
  • handle signed integers

Sample output:

-7            11111111 11111111 11111111 11111001
7             00000000 00000000 00000000 00000111
-1            11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111
2147483647    01111111 11111111 11111111 11111111
-2147483648   10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
0             00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
2             00000000 00000000 00000000 00000010
-2            11111111 11111111 11111111 11111110
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Roughly:

-(void)someFunction
{
  NSLog([self toBinary:input]);
}

-(NSString *)toBinary:(NSInteger)input
{
  if (input == 1 || input == 0) {
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", input];
  }
  else {
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%d", [self toBinary:input / 2], input % 2];
  }
}
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1  
What if the input is zero? –  epatel Mar 17 '09 at 20:16
    
This fails if the input is 0 (or in fact if the last bit is 0), and it also allocates and deallocates N string objects, where N is the number of bits in the number. Not very efficient. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 17 '09 at 20:27
    
Hence roughly. But good catch. –  Benjamin Autin Mar 17 '09 at 20:35
    
NSMutableString is derived from NSString, so insertString probably does the same thing as this. –  Benjamin Autin Mar 17 '09 at 20:40
    
Except it doesn't. insertString:atIndex: inserts into the same buffer (and expands the buffer if necessary), whereas stringWithFormat allocates a new autoreleased NSString object. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 17 '09 at 20:46
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