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I would like to make an alias of or an extended version of System.out.println() for printing my variables of various types. How does one pass an argument with unknown type/class to a method?

public static void p(VariableType... args) {
    System.out.println(args[0]);
    // ...
}
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7  
If you use eclipse, typing "syso" and hitting CTRL+Space is sufficient. –  Jacob Jul 2 '11 at 16:02
2  
Design suggestion: if your variables are all related, they should be grouped in some class (MyVars). Then you would only have to override toString() of that class and call System.out.println(myVars);. –  toto2 Jul 2 '11 at 16:04
    
cularis, I use IntelliJ IDEA. –  Andrei Jul 2 '11 at 16:20
    
toto, I just wanted smth shorter. It is a small program for CLI and I got annoyed by retyping the standard method. –  Andrei Jul 2 '11 at 16:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unless you want lots of lines in the output, you could do.

public static <PrintableToString> void p(PrintableToString... args) {
    for(PrintableToString pts: args)
        System.out.print(pts);
    System.out.println();
}
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1  
Usualy, generic class Name consists of one letter :) –  Eng.Fouad Jul 2 '11 at 16:17
3  
True, But there is no way to specifiy that the object should have a printable/sensible toString() method. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 2 '11 at 16:25

You can use Object.

public static void p(Object... args) {
  System.out.println(args[0]);
  // ...
}
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Thanks! I thought I have tried this, but apparently not. :) –  Andrei Jul 2 '11 at 15:57
1  
+1 here, and implement toString() in each class of the variables you're going to print. How does that not work ? Care to explain a bit more ? –  c00kiemon5ter Jul 2 '11 at 16:01
    
Ivan, if your question is for me, then when I was trying with Object there was another mistake which brought me to the wrong conclusion. So I was expecting this answer stackoverflow.com/questions/6558008/… –  Andrei Jul 2 '11 at 16:18

How about this:

public static <T> void p(T... args)
{
    System.out.println(args[0]);
    // ...
}
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This is elegant, but it restrains that all arguments have to be of the same type. –  Marcelo Jul 2 '11 at 17:36
2  
@Marcelo: No it doesn't (try it if you don't believe me) –  user102008 Aug 31 '11 at 7:16

Others have answered your question.

I'd just like to point out that your p method is a bad style and (probably) a bad idea:

  1. The method name p doesn't tell anyone what it does.

  2. Writing to standard output is usually a bad idea. The exception is when the application is designed to be run as a command line utility.

  3. Even if it is right to write to standard output, doing it that way is limiting your ability to reuse your code. A better approach is to make the stream a parameter; e.g.

    public void outputFoo(Foo foo, PrintStream ps) {
        ps.println("Foo's bar is " + foo.bar);
        // ...
    }
    
  4. If the p method is going to be used for trace prints, then using your p wrapper rather than System.err.println will hide the traceprints from style checkers like PMD. You might think this is a good thing, but in fact it is a bad thing, because now PMD won't remind you to remove the trace prints before you put your code into production / ship it to customers.

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Thanks for your advices! My program is a very simple one, just to learn how to parse RSS-feed and post to a server. I wanted a simple shortcut for printing out. –  Andrei Jul 2 '11 at 16:26
1  
Well it's your code ... but I wouldn't do that. –  Stephen C Jul 2 '11 at 16:31
    
Thanks again! This is my first Java program, by the way. –  Andrei Jul 2 '11 at 16:40

Simply use Object, because Object is the type of all Java variables.

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