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Please tell me what is of parent object instantiating with child class like:

 public class A
    {
        public A()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("A");
        }
        public virtual void method()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("AM");
        }

    }
    public class B : A
    {
        public B()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("B");

        }
        public new void method()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("BM");

        }
        public void method1()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("BM1");
        }
    }

 class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            A obj = new B();// what is use of it?
            obj.method();              
            Console.Read();
        }
        private void methodP1()
        {

        }
    }

please tell me what is use of Parent obj = new Child(); as i we can only call to only public methods of parent class which is possible using Parent obj = new Parent();

is it possible: Child obj = new Parent() ?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

please tell me what is use of Parent obj = new Child(); as i we can only call to only public methods of parent class which is possible using Parent obj = new Parent();

This is the basis for polymorphism: Imagine you have several child classes that inherit from you parent class. You want to use all these child classes through the interface / methods defined on your parent class, without worrying about the implementation details in each child class (each might do something different, but with the same overall semantics).

This is possible because the child class has a IS A relationship with its parent class since child inherits from parent.

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In your example, B is-a A, but A is-not-a B.

The above is of use when the code using the reference to B can only understand (or needs to understand) types of A. B is a specialisation of A. Imagine something like (pseudo-code)

Shape s;
if (x == 1) {
  s = new Square();
}
else {
  s = new Triangle();
}
// following code knows only about Shapes
s.draw();
s.calculateArea();

The following code doesn't need to know if s is a square or a triangle, just that it's a shape. What use is that ? If you call s.draw(), the shape itself determines how it's going to look. The code calling it doesn't know or care.

This is a key point of object-oriented programming. Asking objects to do things for you rather than determine yourself what's needed.

Note that your final question doesn't intuitively make sense when using this example.

Shape s = new Square(); // fine

vs

Square s = new Shape(); // can you instantiate a "shape" and why then do you decide it's a square?

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BrokenGlass's answer is correct. However, your sample will have different behaviour depending upon whether you declare obj as type A or B.

In the case of A obj = new B(); the program will output A B AM because the compiler is linking to the virtual method A.method, which class B then inherits.

In the case of B obj = new B(); the program outputs A B BM because the compiler is directed to use the new method B.method().

If B.method() was instead declared as public override void method(), then the output would always be A B BM regardless of whether obj was declared as type A or type B.

Thus your example does not show polymorphism in the classic sense, as the method called on instances of type B depends on the type of the variable to which the instance is assigned. This can make debugging fun and interesting.

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If you have to use only the methods on the parent class, you can go ahead and instantiate it. The object of a child class is to add functionality to the parent class while keeping the parent intact. Instantiating the parent through the child without further use of the child functionality does not make sense.

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not understood, please provide more details –  Dr. Rajesh Rolen Jul 2 '11 at 17:06
    
If all you need to use is the functions of the parent class, you do not need to instantiate it through a child class. –  Banago Jul 2 '11 at 17:12

There's no use in simple examples like yours, where the scope of usage for the variable is limited. But it's important to understand that in .NET variables has types that are static, known at compile time and even if obj keeps a reference to Child class, it is still typed as Parent.

And when you have method that requires Parent, you can pass obj (with type Child) to it (and it still behaves like Child) - this is an example of Child being referred by Parent type.

Child obj = new Parent() is not possible, Parent is not a Child, compiler wouldn't let you assign object to variable of incompatible type.

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The reason that you would use polymorphism is so that you can pass a more specific object to an entity that only requires a more general object. The entity that receives the object only cares about the public interface that is exposed, not the details of how the methods in that interface are carried out. Here's a simple class hierarchy:

public class Animal
{
    public virtual string GetFood()
    {
        return "Food";         
    }
}

public class Monkey : Animal
{
    public override string GetFood()
    {
        return "Bananas";
    }
}

public class Cow : Animal
{
    public override string GetFood()
    {
        return "Grass";
    }
}

And here's how you could use the polymorphism:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Animal[] animalArray = { new Monkey(), new Cow() };
        foreach (Animal a in animalArray) {
            WhatDoIEat(a); // Prints "Bananas", then "Grass"
        }         
    }

    static void WhatDoIEat(Animal a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(a.GetFood());
    }
}
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Say you have a parent class called Animal and child classes called Dog, Cat, and Lizard. Each class has a method call makeSound(). Then when you say Animal a1 = new Dog(); and Animal a2 = new Cat(), a1.makeSound() will bark and a2.makeSound() will meow.

The technical term for this behavior is called polymorphism. It is useful for code reuse. You only need to write code once for an application that has Animals makeSound() when they are happy, instead of separate code for each animal type.

Another use of polymorphism is hiding your code's implementation from other users. For example you can show other users that you are using a List and then you have the choice to implement the List as a LinkedList or as an ArrayList. You can also choose a LinkedList and then at a later time switch to an ArrayList without effecting your users.

You also can't say Dog d = new Animal() because a Dog is an Animal but an Animal is not necessarily a Dog.

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