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I am trying to convert a string encoded in java in UTF-8 to ISO-8859-1. Say for example, in the string 'âabcd' 'â' is represented in ISO-8859-1 as E2. In UTF-8 it is represented as two bytes. C3 A2 I believe. When I do a getbytes(encoding) and then create a new string with the bytes in ISO-8859-1 encoding, I get a two different chars. â. Is there any other way to do this so as to keep the character the same i.e. âabcd?

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7 Answers 7

If you're dealing with character encodings other than UTF-16, you shouldn't be using java.lang.String or the char primitive -- you should only be using byte[] arrays or ByteBuffer objects. Then, you can use java.nio.charset.Charset to convert between encodings:

Charset utf8charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
Charset iso88591charset = Charset.forName("ISO-8859-1");

ByteBuffer inputBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(new byte[]{(byte)0xC3, (byte)0xA2});

// decode UTF-8
CharBuffer data = utf8charset.decode(inputBuffer);

// encode ISO-8559-1
ByteBuffer outputBuffer = iso88591charset.encode(data);
byte[] outputData = outputBuffer.array();
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Thanks a lot.. Really helpful - Luckylak –  luckylak Mar 18 '09 at 20:10
2  
Yes really good remark. In Java, String is itself encoded in UTF-16. Always. It makes no sense to think of Strings encoded in something else. Instead you have raw data (Bytes) which represent text in some encoding. Then you decode (using some encoding) to String (in UTF-16), or from String to bytes. Upvoted! –  Stijn de Witt Mar 23 '11 at 11:03
    
@Adam Rosenfield: Byte[] ==> byte[] –  AndrewBourgeois Aug 29 '13 at 7:22
    
If we are getting input string from an Edittext in Android how can we get a raw byte array as the string will be already UTF-16 encoded. –  ozmank Nov 27 '13 at 8:17
    
Thank you so much..this made my day.. :) –  Komal Sorathiya May 4 at 5:01
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byte[] iso88591Data = theString.getBytes("ISO-8859-1");

Will do the trick. From your description it seems as if you're trying to "store an ISO-8859-1 String". String objects in Java are always implicitely encoded in UTF-16. There's no way to change that encoding.

What you can do, 'though is to get the bytes that constitute some other encoding of it (using the .getBytes() method as shown above).

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Thank you, this helped me resolve the problem when creating a file: my filename string contained a line feed character that I couldn't notice until I printed the string in log like this: string = new String(string.getBytes("UTF-16")); Log.d(TAG, string); and I saw the extra character there –  Bojan Radivojevic Bomber Sep 15 '11 at 11:15
    
Thanks for specifying that "String objects in Java are always implicitely encoded in UTF-16" - this solved a problem I was having and is generally useful to know! –  Joel Malone Apr 8 '13 at 14:12
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Starting with a set of bytes which encode a string using UTF-8, creates a string from that data, then get some bytes encoding the string in a different encoding:

    byte[] utf8bytes = { (byte)0xc3, (byte)0xa2, 0x61, 0x62, 0x63, 0x64 };
    Charset utf8charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
    Charset iso88591charset = Charset.forName("ISO-8859-1");

    String string = new String ( utf8bytes, utf8charset );

    System.out.println(string);

    // "When I do a getbytes(encoding) and "
    byte[] iso88591bytes = string.getBytes(iso88591charset);

    for ( byte b : iso88591bytes )
        System.out.printf("%02x ", b);

    System.out.println();

    // "then create a new string with the bytes in ISO-8859-1 encoding"
    String string2 = new String ( iso88591bytes, iso88591charset );

    // "I get a two different chars"
    System.out.println(string2);

this outputs strings and the iso88591 bytes correctly:

âabcd 
e2 61 62 63 64 
âabcd

So your byte array wasn't paired with the correct encoding:

    String failString = new String ( utf8bytes, iso88591charset );

    System.out.println(failString);

Outputs

âabcd

(either that, or you just wrote the utf8 bytes to a file and read them elsewhere as iso88591)

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Look into the classes in java.nio.charset.

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If you have the correct encoding in the string, you need not do more to get the bytes for another encoding.

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    printBytes("â");
    System.out.println(
            new String(new byte[] { (byte) 0xE2 }, "ISO-8859-1"));
    System.out.println(
            new String(new byte[] { (byte) 0xC3, (byte) 0xA2 }, "UTF-8"));
}

private static void printBytes(String str) {
    System.out.println("Bytes in " + str + " with ISO-8859-1");
    for (byte b : str.getBytes(StandardCharsets.ISO_8859_1)) {
        System.out.printf("%3X", b);
    }
    System.out.println();
    System.out.println("Bytes in " + str + " with UTF-8");
    for (byte b : str.getBytes(StandardCharsets.UTF_8)) {
        System.out.printf("%3X", b);
    }
    System.out.println();
}

Output:

Bytes in â with ISO-8859-1
 E2
Bytes in â with UTF-8
 C3 A2
â
â
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For files encoding...

public class FRomUtf8ToIso {
        static File input = new File("C:/Users/admin/Desktop/pippo.txt");
        static File output = new File("C:/Users/admin/Desktop/ciccio.txt");


    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

        BufferedReader br = null;

        FileWriter fileWriter = new FileWriter(output);
        try {

            String sCurrentLine;

            br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader( input ));

            int i= 0;
            while ((sCurrentLine = br.readLine()) != null) {
                byte[] isoB =  encode( sCurrentLine.getBytes() );
                fileWriter.write(new String(isoB, Charset.forName("ISO-8859-15") ) );
                fileWriter.write("\n");
                System.out.println( i++ );
            }

        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            try {
                fileWriter.flush();
                fileWriter.close();
                if (br != null)br.close();
            } catch (IOException ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }
        }

    }


    static byte[] encode(byte[] arr){
        Charset utf8charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");
        Charset iso88591charset = Charset.forName("ISO-8859-15");

        ByteBuffer inputBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap( arr );

        // decode UTF-8
        CharBuffer data = utf8charset.decode(inputBuffer);

        // encode ISO-8559-1
        ByteBuffer outputBuffer = iso88591charset.encode(data);
        byte[] outputData = outputBuffer.array();

        return outputData;
    }

}
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evict non ISO-8859-1 characters, will be replace by '?' (before send to a ISO-8859-1 DB by example):

utf8String = new String ( utf8String.getBytes(), "ISO-8859-1" );

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Replacing all the non-ASCII characters with ? seems like a terrible solution when it's possible to convert the string without losing them. –  Sidnicious Mar 25 '11 at 16:30
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protected by Will Mar 30 '11 at 13:08

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