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According to the R language definition the difference between & and && (correspondingly | and ||) is that the former is vectorized while the later is not.

According to this site: http://www.stat.psu.edu/~dhunter/R/html/base/html/Logic.html I read the difference akin to the difference between an "And" and "AndAlso" (correspondingly "Or" and "OrElse")...meaning that not all evaluations if they don't have to be (i.e. A or B or C is always true if A is true, so stop evaluating if A is true)

Could someone shed light here? Also, is there an AndAlso and OrElse in R?

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Also see similar questions at stackoverflow.com/q/6933598/210673 and stackoverflow.com/q/7953833/210673 (now closed as a duplicate). –  Aaron Oct 22 '12 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 87 down vote accepted

The shorter ones are vectorized, meaning they can return a vector, like this:

> ((-2:2) >= 0) & ((-2:2) <= 0)
[1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE

The longer form evaluates left to right examining only the first element of each vector, so the above gives

> ((-2:2) >= 0) && ((-2:2) <= 0)
[1] FALSE

As the help page says, this makes the longer form "appropriate for programming control-flow and [is] typically preferred in if clauses."

So you want to use the long forms only when you are certain the vectors are length one.

You should be absolutely certain your vectors are only length 1, such as in cases where they are functions that return only length 1 booleans. You want to use the short forms if the vectors are length possibly >1. So if you're not absolutely sure, you should either check first, or use the short form and then use all and any to reduce it to length one for use in control flow statements, like if.

The functions all and any are often used on the result of a vectorized comparison to see if all or any of the comparisons are true, respectively. The results from these functions are sure to be length 1 so they are appropriate for use in if clauses, while the results from the vectorized comparison are not. (Though those results would be appropriate for use in ifelse.

One final difference: the && and || only evaluate as many terms as they need to (which seems to be what is meant by short-circuiting). For example, here's a comparison using an undefined value a; if it didn't short-circuit, as & and | don't, it would give an error.

> a
Error: object 'a' not found
> TRUE || a
[1] TRUE
> FALSE && a
[1] FALSE
> TRUE | a
Error: object 'a' not found
> FALSE & a
Error: object 'a' not found

Finally, see section 8.2.17 in The R Inferno, titled "and and andand".

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I'm comparing logicals of length 1. The documentation is not clear about why its preferred for control-flow. Is that because it uses the "short-circuit" from @Theo's answers and thus has better performance? –  SFun28 Jul 2 '11 at 19:21
    
nope. Just use the short form '&' -- the short-circuit answers are incorrect. –  M. Tibbits Jul 2 '11 at 19:25
    
No. Theo is just wrong. You get a warning from && if one of its arguments is longer than 1. It's possible that you meant to give it a vector and only assess the first value but it's more often the case that you were confused. –  BondedDust Jul 2 '11 at 19:25
1  
No, because it guarantees to have only a single TRUE/FALSE answer. The shorter forms could result in c(TRUE, FALSE), and the if statement wouldn't be clear. If you are certain everything has length 1, then yes, either would do, and you are correct that the "short-circuit" is the reason for preferring one. A word of warning though, make sure you are 100% sure they can only be length one. You can get really goofy bugs otherwise. –  Aaron Jul 2 '11 at 19:28
3  
@SFun28: Yes, short-circuiting is the reason it preferred for flow control. As well as better performance, you may not want to evaluate all arguments. The canonical example is given in ?is.R for checking whether you are running R or S-Plus. if(exists("is.R") && is.function(is.R) && is.R()). If is.R doesn't exist, then you don't want to evaluate is.function(is.R) since it will throw an error. Likewise if is.R isn't a function, you don't want to call it as though it is. –  Richie Cotton Jul 4 '11 at 12:49

The answer about "short-circuiting" is potentially misleading, but has some truth (see below). In the R/S language, && and || only evaluate the first element in the first argument. All others if the argument is a vector are ignored regardless of the first ones value. They are designed to work with the if (cond) {} else{} construction. The & and the | operators are designed to work on vectors, so they will be applied "in parallel" so to speak along the length of the longest argument. If the vectors are not the same length then recycling of the short argument is performed.

When the arguments to && or || are functions, there is "short-circuiting" in that if any of the values in succession from left to right are determinative, then evaluations cease and the final value is returned.

> if( print(1) ) {print(2)} else {print(3)}
[1] 1
[1] 2
> if(FALSE && print(1) ) {print(2)} else {print(3)}
[1] 3
> if(TRUE && print(1) ) {print(2)} else {print(3)}
[1] 1
[1] 2
> if(TRUE && !print(1) ) {print(2)} else {print(3)}
[1] 1
[1] 3
> if(FALSE && !print(1) ) {print(2)} else {print(3)}
[1] 3
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"short-circuiting" is a new term to me, but it seems to me that the answer describing it agrees with what you say about && and ||. –  Aaron Jul 2 '11 at 19:22
    
@DWin - in the case of operatoring over length 1 logicals, they are equivalent right? I'm trying to understand why they are preferred in control-flow as the documentation states. Also, does R have a "short-circuit" construct? –  SFun28 Jul 2 '11 at 19:23
    
They are NOT equivalent for vectors of length > 1 –  M. Tibbits Jul 2 '11 at 19:26
2  
It is true that if the arguments to && are functions and the first one is false, then the second one will not be evaluated. That is not true for either & or ifelse which will evaluate both arguments. –  BondedDust Jul 2 '11 at 19:29
    
Isn't that what Theo's answer about short-circuiting says too? –  Aaron Jul 2 '11 at 19:36

&& and || are what is called "short circuiting". That means that they will not evaluate the second operand if the first operand is enough to determine the value of the expression.

For example if the first operand to && is false then there is no point in evaluating the second operand, since it can't change the value of the expression (false && true and false && false are both false). The same goes for || when the first operand is true.

You can read more about this here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation From the table on that page you can see that && is equivalent to AndAlso in VB.NET, which I assume you are referring to.

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1  
This should be proof enough that it is short circuiting: f <- function() { print('hello'); TRUE }; FALSE && f(). Change to & and notice that the function is evaluated. QED. –  Theo Jul 2 '11 at 19:32
1  
Theo, yes, you are correct that && and || short-circuit. But that's really a fairly minor point in comparisons between the short form and the long form; it's much more important to understand what each does when the inputs are vectors. –  Aaron Jul 2 '11 at 19:37
1  
@MTibbits In fact this is not a complete answer, but the statement about short circuiting is correct. Try F & {message("Boo!");T} and F && {message("Boo!");T}. –  mbq Jul 2 '11 at 19:39
    
Right you are @mbq. Sorry for the confusion -- I deleted that comment. –  M. Tibbits Jul 2 '11 at 22:25

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